CNPS San Diego Chapter - California Native Plant Society
 

Program Archive

An archive of past Chapter Meeting programs going back to 1999 as announced on this web site

 

May 19, 2015

Speaker - Lynnette Short

Overview of the CAL FIRE Urban and Community Forestry Program

CAL FIRE Badge


Urban Forestry Program logo



In this presentation, Lynnette will briefly touch on the function of CAL FIRE before illustrating the details of the Urban and Community Forestry (U&CF) Program which will include a description of California’s Urban Forests. The purpose of the U&CF Program is to establish and maintain optimal urban and community forests to help improve the quality of life of urban citizens and the quality of urban natural resources. To accomplish this, CAL FIRE’s Regional Urban Foresters provide information, education, and assistance to local governments, non-profits, private sector organizations, and the general public that help to advance Urban Forestry per the Urban Forestry Act of 1978, updated in 2010 (PRC 4799.06 – 4799.12). The structure and delivery of the U&CF Program is built upon cooperative relationships with and technical assistance to local governments, non-profit organizations, and private companies. As one mechanism for encouraging better U&CF management practices, the Program provides grants with bond funds for the many economic, environmental, and social benefits that urban society gains from urban and community forests. For example, grants are issued for tree planting, comprehensive urban forest management plans, tree resource inventories, educational programs, and innovative ideas that promote Urban Forestry in California.

Lynnette will also discuss the sustainability component of the Program, as well as her work with other State agencies and researchers to develop a carbon sequestration protocol and companion accounting protocol for U&CF in the emerging carbon credit trading market. These protocols have been officially adopted by the California Climate Action Registry and the California Air Resources Board.

Lynnette Short serves as the State’s Regional Urban Forester for San Diego, Imperial and Orange counties. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Forestry & Natural Resource Management from Cal Poly - San Luis Obispo. She started her career with CAL FIRE in 2003 as a firefighter and later took a Resource Management position in San Diego. She has been with the U&CF Program since 2006.

 

April 21, 2015

Speaker - Tom Oberbauer

Obscure Islands of the Pacific Coast of Baja California



The Pacific Coast of Baja California is home to a number of islands that range in size from a few acres to Cedros Island that is nearly 350 sq. kilometers.  A number of islands are little known and little explored scientifically, beginning with the Coronado Islands that are visible off shore just to the south of Point Loma.  Others include Todos Santos Islands off Ensenada; San Geronimo near El Rosario; San Martin, a volcanic crater near San Quintin; and Natividad and the San Benito group near Cedros Island.  Many of them support endemic plants, and in particular, the Genus Dudleya is well represented on the islands.  Each island was formed under different conditions ranging from volcanic to odd mixes of rock material that has been smashed together in ancient continental subduction zones and later pushed to the surface.  Each island is a spectacular visual feast.
In early April, Tom Oberbauer will join a small expedition attempting to land and explore these islands.  He hopes to bring back many new pictures of the islands, but also has beautiful pictures from previous trips.  He has extensive experience examining Baja’s islands’ botanical resources over the past 36 years. He gave a presentation about Guadalupe Island to our chapter in 2010.

 

March 17, 2015

Speaker - Dylan Burge

Diversification of Ceanothus

Dylan Burge

The genus Ceanothus is highly diverse in California, with more than 50 species known from the State. Diversification of this ecologically and horticulturally significant group of plants is strongly associated with the unusual climates and geology of California, with many extremely rare species limited to small areas with unusual weather conditions and rock strata. This presentation will focus on the interesting story of Ceanothus diversification involving new research findings from several fields, much of it carried out by the presenter Dylan Burge. Many fascinating Ceanothus species found in San Diego County and northern Baja California will be discussed, including their evolutionary history, distribution, and ecology. Photographs of rare Ceanothus species in native habitats around California and San Diego County will be featured.

Dylan Burge grew up in rural northern California, where he developed a love for biodiversity very early on. He attended UC Davis and Duke University; conducted post-doctoral research in Australia and British Columbia; and performed field work around the world. In addition to botanical research, Dylan likes to spend time hiking on the Pacific Crest Trail, and taking photographs of plants in the wild.

 

February 17, 2015

Speaker - Jay Wilson

Mission Trails Regional Park Has Something for Everyone


Jay Wilson

There is much more to do at Mission Trails than climbing Cowles Mountain! Jay will give an overview of Mission Trails Regional Park with its unique treasure-trove of Natural Resources which includes gems that appeal to everyone: engaging in nature activities in the Visitor Center; participating in free monthly art exhibitions and concerts; communing with nature at the Kumeyaay Lake Campground; learning about native plants and wildlife during guided nature walks, while meeting new friends with similar interests; exploring the “West Sycamore” Nature Area, the most recent addition to the Park consisting of over 1,000 acres; and much more. The presentation will emphasize endemic plant species in the Park and spur a spirited information-sharing discussion about the “natural treasures” encountered during Park excursions by audience members.

Jay Wilson is Executive Director of the Mission Trails Regional Park Foundation. A native San Diegan, Jay spent 10 years in the Marketing Department for Sea World and 5 years as Director of Marketing for the Zoological Society of San Diego. Recently, Jay worked 14 years as with Councilmembers Judy McCarty and Jim Madaffer. He enjoys computers, technology, and his grandchildren.

 

January 20, 2015

Speaker - Don Rideout

All about the Garden Native Tour 2015

Photo by James Nyun

Don Rideout will give a presentation about the Garden Native Tour 2015
to be held on Saturday-Sunday, March 28-29,9:30am-4:30pm.   
Featured gardens will be in the Cities of San Diego and Poway.  FALL IN LOVE with gorgeous gardens.  
Each landscape embodies Southern California outdoor living in a unique and personal way.

Designed with native California and other climate-appropriate plants, all take far less water, effort, and money than conventional gardens and lawns. In fact, our gardens use anywhere from 17% to 100% less water than conventional gardens!

Many homes feature:

•Edible gardens
•Artwork and hardscape from repurposed materials
•Rain barrels and bioswales
•Graywater systems
•Turf replacement
•Solar panels and much more!
TAKE PRIDE in San Diego
The Garden Native Tour represents all regions of San Diego County on a rotating basis. In 2015, we highlight:

•Old Town
•Balboa Park and North Park
•Clairemont and University City
•Tierrasanta
•Carmel Valley and Rancho Penasquitos
•Poway and Scripps Ranch

ENSURE THE FUTURE health and well-being of our communities.  We strive to help people like you make great landscape choices. Your choices lead to cleaner oceans, healthier soils, and stronger pollinators. 

 

 

November 18, 2014

Speaker - Sula Vanderplank

When California Plants Go South: Mediterranean Mexico

Sula Vanderplank leaning on an agave.

Sula will give an overview of the distribution of our California plants in northwestern Baja California, where the California Floristic Province meets the Vizcaino Desert to the south. She will address weather, range limits, endemism, and changes in the biogeography, phenology and phylogenetic affinities of the plants in this ecotone. She will provide a brief look at ongoing projects towards improving our understanding of the flora of this region and protecting it through various conservation initiatives.

Sula is also studying the unique plants that grow on shell middens left behind by the indigenous peoples of the region. Her Master’s research suggests that the flora of these middens is distinct from the surrounding areas and habitats, and warrants further research.

Further, Sula is part of a project to assemble an inventory of all the rare and endemic plants of the California Floristic Province portion of Baja California (i.e., the northwest area of the state). Collaborators in this project include Bart O’Brien (Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden), Jose Delgadillo (Universidad Autónoma de Baja California), Steve Junak (Santa Barbara Botanic Garden), Tom Oberbauer (AECOM), Jon Rebman (San Diego Natural History Museum), and Hugo Riemann (Colegio de la Fronterra).

Sula Vanderplank is a Biodiversity Explorer for the Botanical Research Institute of Texas. Her research has focused on the macroecology of Baja California, with an emphasis on plant distributions along the Pacific Coast of the state of Baja California and the adjacent islands. Sula also serves as Science Advisor for the Mexican land trust Terra Peninsular, through which she is involved in several collaborative projects relating to conservation in northwestern Baja California, with particular regard to the conservation of Maritime Succulent Scrub, an endangered habitat found nowhere else in the world. Collaboration with staff from Huntington Botanical Gardens and Club La Mision recently culminated in a field guide, Quail-Friendly Plants of North-West Baja California, to more than 120 plant species in this region.

 

October 21, 2014

Speaker - Christina Schaefer

Developing a Programmatic Monitoring Approach for
Vernal Pool Restoration on Otay Mesa

Christina Schaefer

With increasing development pressure on Otay Mesa, a landscape that was historically dominated by vernal pool complexes, vernal pool restoration to mitigate for development projects is becoming very frequent on the mesa. To document the progress of vernal pool restoration projects over time, post-restoration monitoring methods compare data collected at the restored vernal pools (treatment) to data collected in natural vernal pool systems (i.e., control or reference sites). To minimize impacts on the remaining natural vernal pool complexes on Otay Mesa from multiple post-restoration monitoring surveys, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service suggested that a programmatic reference site be identified for all vernal pool restoration projects on the mesa. The vernal pool complex J-26 is one of the last remaining relatively intact complexes and was chosen to function as the programmatic reference site. Ms. Schaefer developed a programmatic monitoring program compatible with the data collection needs for vernal pool restoration projects. The data are being submitted to the San Diego Monitoring and Management Program multi-taxa database to be available for all entities that need reference data for their vernal pool restoration success monitoring.

September 16, 2014

Speaker - Greg Rubin

California Native Landscaping Protocols

Greg framed by a gnarled manzanita branch

In this presentation Greg will be outlining the specific ways in which California native landscape protocols differ from an ornamental horticultural approach, and the justifications for each. This is the result of Greg’s nearly 30 years of practical experience in hundreds of different situations throughout Southern California. Topics will include commercial growing, site preparation, plant selection, planting season, planting techniques, irrigation, and maintenance. Greg will also discuss some of the controversies surrounding the use of these different approaches, and the impact this has had on the growth of the industry.

Greg Rubin is a native landscape design/build contractor having worked on over 700 native landscapes in southern California. Greg is a popular lecturer, has written numerous articles on native landscaping, has been featured in a number of periodicals, and co-authored the book "The California Native Landscape" with Lucy Warren, published by Timber Press.

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Speaker - Anne Fege Ph.D.

Celebrating 50 Years of Wilderness - Affected Primarily by the Forces of Nature

Wilderness Act 50th Anniversary Logo

The Wilderness Act was historic and inspirational, signed on September 3, 1964. Fifty years later, it endures and still inspires. Please join CNPS, Anne Fege and many others this evening in celebrating the history and now the vastness of the National Wilderness Preservation System, 109 million acres in 44 states. Locally, Agua Tibia Wilderness was established in 1975; Hauser, Pine Creek and San Mateo Canyon wildernesses followed in 1984; and others in the 1994 California Desert Protection Act.
The Wilderness Act states that “A wilderness, in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain…. [These areas are] affected primarily by the forces of nature, with the imprint of man's work substantially unnoticeable.” For San Diegans, this means that we are within an hour’s drive of wilderness areas that have quiet, dark sky, wind, weather, and native plants. 
The Wilderness Act provides for areas with “outstanding opportunities for solitude or a primitive and unconfined type of recreation… [and have] ecological, geological, or other features of scientific, educational, scenic, or historical value.” Native plants have a special place and protection in wilderness. Our legacy will be to keep these wilderness areas affected primarily by the forces of nature, to use and enjoy wilderness, to restrict human imprints, and help secure the enduring resource of wilderness.

Anne S. Fege, Ph.D., is a CNPS member; retired Forest Supervisor, Cleveland National Forest (1991-2004) and National Wilderness Program Manager, Forest Service (1988 to 1991); and is currently Chair of the Community Forest Advisory Board, City of San Diego, and Program Manager of the San Diego Children and Nature Collaborative (part of the San Diego Science Alliance).


July 15, 2014

Speaker - Mike Wilken

Kumeyaay Ethnobotany:
Native Plants and People on the Frontier of the Californias
Mike Wilken at sunset

The Kumeyaay Indians (also ‘Iipay–Tiipay or Diegueño in the United States, or Kumiai in Mexico) have inhabited the landscapes of northern Baja California, Mexico, and southern California since long before European contact, originally making a living as mobile hunting, gathering, and fishing peoples in the region’s varied environments. The division of Kumeyaay territory in 1848 by two distinct nation states imposed on the region an international boundary as well as separate political and economic structures, cultures, and languages. Historical processes have reduced Kumeyaay territory and population, and transformed indigenous life-ways, yet a few elder Kumeyaay still speak their native language and maintain cultural knowledge of the environment.

This presentation will explore the questions of how contemporary ethnobotanical knowledge of Baja California’s Kumeyaay Indians makes new contributions to scientific research of diachronic human–plant interactions in the study area, and how this knowledge can inform Kumeyaay cultural and linguistic revitalization through its incorporation in interpretive exhibits. This information is a synthesis from interviews conducted with 16 Kumeyaay plant specialists, documenting Kumeyaay knowledge of traditional uses for 47 native plants as food, medicine, tools, construction materials, and ritual resources covering indigenous nomenclature, plant scheduling, harvesting, processing, and consumption, as well as cultural meanings associated with plants. Archaeological, historical, ethnographic, linguistic, and botanical literature to situate the Kumeyaay ethnobotanical data will be reviewed in a regional and diachronic context.

Mike Wilken is an anthropologist whose research and advocacy work with Native Baja Californians has explored traditional arts (pottery, basketry, oral narratives and song), ethnobotany, history, languages and cultural landscapes of the indigenous peoples of the northern Baja California region for over 30 years. He has worked closely with native artists and traditional authorities to foster cultural revitalization and sustainable community development.

 

June 17, 2014

Speakers - Fred Roberts & Bob Allen

Wildflowers of Orange County and the Santa Ana Mountains
Bob Allen and Fred Roberts book signing

In a bold new approach, this field guide presents wildflowers of cismontane southern California and some of the associated wildlife (guilds), making it much more than a traditional wildflower guide. It includes sections on geology, geography, flower parts, scientific names, plant communities, field safety, and places to go wildflower-watching, all accompanied by photographs and illustrations. In addition to common and not-so-common wildflower species, it presents rare plants not found in other field guides such as Munz’s onion; Braunton’s milkvetch; Encinitas baccharis; small-flowered morning-glory; heart-leaved pitcher-sage; chaparral beargrass; Allen’s daisy; Hammitt’s clay-cress; big-leaved crownbeard; and several unique button-celery, brodiaeas, mariposa lilies, spineflowers, tarplants, live-forevers, monkeyflowers, monardellas, navarretias, and phacelias. Guilds include milkweed, cactus, California sycamore, California buckwheat, California lilac, yucca, and cattail. Associated species include insects such as monarch butterfly, goldenbush borer beetle, snowberry clearwing moth, and native bees; and birds such as coastal California gnatcatcher, cactus wren, Anna’s hummingbird, and phainopepla.

The book (2013) is in paperback with durable cover; 10 x 7”; 500 pages; 2,300 color photos, 363 illustrations, 1 regional map, and 11 trail maps.

Bob Allen is an instructor, photographer, and entomologist/ botanist who specializes in pollination.

Fred Roberts is a botanist, photographer, and artist specializing in plants of Orange County, oaks, rare plants, and lilies and their relatives.

 

 

 

May 20, 2014

Speaker - Dr. Norrie Robbins

What is a native plant? When did it arrive? How do we know?”
Dr. Norrie Robbins biting a native willow stem

Palynologists such as Dr. Norrie Robbins have a different view about native plants. Dr. Robbins studies the fossil spores and pollen grains of prehistoric plants in sedimentary rocks of different ages. These studies reveal that forests and plant species are ever-changing in response to climatic factors, diseases, tectonic changes, rising and falling sea levels, etc. Studies of more recent (historic) plant pollen and spores from cores drilled into soft sediments postulate on when “early people” may have arrived to our region, how they used and impacted native plant communities, and how these communities continued to change with the arrival of Europeans and other people. At this presentation, Dr. Robbins will examine questions exploring the relationship between native plants and “early people” such as: Did people arrive to California in boats 40,000 years ago planting seeds and plants from their homelands along the seashore which were important to their subsistence? Did the well-studied people who arrived in California 13,000 years ago plant seeds from their homelands to ensure important medicinal plants would be available to them? These questions are likely to spur lively discussions on what constitutes true “native plants” in our region.

Dr. Eleanora (Norrie) Robbins is a geologist, now adjunct faculty at San Diego State University, retired from the U.S Geological Service. As a Mesozoic Palynologist, Dr. Robbins studied the ever-changing plant communities in deep oil-exploration wells from the Atlantic Ocean. When she retired to San Diego, Dr. Robbins wanted to learn about the native vegetation and then became interested in the questions that will be discussed at this presentation.

 

 

April 15, 2014

Speaker - John Randall

The Nature Conservancy’s Plant and Animal Conservation Projects
in Southern California

John M. Randall

An overview of The Nature Conservancy’s (TNC) projects from the northern Channel Islands to the eastern Mojave Desert and southward to San Diego County and northwestern Baja California will focus on plant conservation. John will discuss TNC’s traditional strengths of land protection and conservation management to newer approaches such as working with industry, agencies and regulators to influence the siting of large solar energy facilities, as well as their soon-to-be-launched urban conservation project in Greater Los Angeles. John will also cover TNC’s latest work in San Diego County to implement the Natural Community Conservation Program and habitat conservation plans to make the reserve network more climate-resilient.

John M. Randall is a Lead Scientist with TNC’s California South Coast & Deserts Region. John earned a Ph.D from UC Davis in 1991, an MS from Louisiana State (in Marine Science!) in 1986, and a BA from Cornell in 1982. John led TNC’s invasive species program in 1991-2009. He moved to San Diego and assumed his current TNC position in May 2009, and is still greatly enjoying the chance to learn more about the distinctive and gorgeous flora, fauna and wildlands of San Diego County and the region.

 

 

March 18, 2014

Speaker - James Hung

Ecological Importance and Conservation of Native Bees in Southern California


James Hung holding a net to collect bees.

Recent research estimates that over 85% of all terrestrial plant species are pollinated at least in part by animals. As pollination is a crucial process in the life cycle of plants, global declines in pollinator diversity have elicited considerable attention. Native bees are the most important pollinators in temperate ecosystems and are known to decline in the face of disturbances such as habitat loss and degradation. In recent decades, widespread development in Southern California has threatened the rich plant and pollinator communities in this biodiversity hotspot. However, despite growing conservation concerns for both native plants and native bees, little is currently known regarding how disturbances to bee communities affect the reproduction of native plants in non-managed ecosystems.

California harbors one of the richest bee communities on earth, with an estimated 2,000 native bee species, and potentially 600 of these in San Diego. Representing a wide range of sizes, nesting strategies, foraging patterns, and social behaviors, these native bee species now occur in habitats fragmented by urbanization and they coexist with the introduced super-generalist honey bee, which dominates many ecosystems. This presentation will focus on the diversity, natural history, and conservation of native bee species in San Diego, as well as discuss ongoing research to evaluate the state of pollination services in fragmented coastal sage scrub habitats in our area.

Keng-Lou James Hung is primarily an insect ecologist, but has developed a passion for the ecology and conservation of native plants through his recent work on plant-pollinator interactions. James studied bee ecology during his undergraduate at Dartmouth College and now continues this research as a PhD student at UC San Diego.

 

February 18, 2014

Speaker - Michelle Cloud-Hughes

Defending the Rarest of the Rare: Habitat Restoration and Research in Support of Chorizanthe orcuttiana at Naval Base Point Loma (NBPL)


Michelle Cloud-Hughes with chainsaw,
performing habitat restoration work to protect Orcutt’s spineflower populations
at Naval Base Point Loma

Chorizanthe orcuttiana (Orcutt’s spineflower) is an inconspicuous annual in the Polygonaceae, and is endemic to extreme coastal San Diego County. It was presumed extinct for many years until a small population was re-discovered in Encinitas in the early 1990s. Between 1997 and 2003, three populations were located on NBPL. The Soil Ecology and Restoration Group (SERG) at San Diego State University began habitat enhancement projects in 2000 to protect this species, which have continued to the present. These projects have mainly been concerned with the removal of non-native species, including iceplant (Carpobrotus edulis), acacia (Acacia sp.), and natal grass (Melinis repens). Removal of iceplant at the second population in 2003 resulted in over 200 Orcutt’s spineflower individuals surviving in 2005, and the site has continued to support this species since.

Other SERG activities in support of Orcutt’s spineflower have included annual monitoring, both of the plant and its habitat; installation of erosion control materials and native shrubs; and site maintenance. In recent years, SERG research efforts have focused on GIS mapping to determine other potential population sites on NBPL and Cabrillo National Monument; surveying these potential sites for Orcutt’s spineflower; and pollination biology.

Michelle Cloud-Hughes is a botanist and restoration ecologist with the SERG since 1997. She began working with Chorizanthe orcuttiana in 1998, and has been the SERG Project Manager for the Orcutt’s spineflower projects at NBPL since 2006.

 

January 21, 2014

City Heights Vision: An Urban Community Connected to
Science, Conservation, and the Natural World


Speaker - Carla Pisbe

City Heights is primed to become a national model of community-based revitalization that is uniquely grounded in education, environment, and recreation arising from a highly urbanized, densely populated, low-income, and nature-deficient community. While this area faces significant challenges, its assets are immeasurable. City Heights is one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the nation and is host to rich cultural resources.

Two major projects will affect this vision: the “Living Lab” and the “City Heights Canyon Loop Trail.” The Living Lab will be located at the head of Manzanita Canyon and provide a focal point where the community engages in authentic science and conservation to understand how the world works and how they can make a difference. The Loop Trail will seamlessly integrate the urban and natural environments through a connected neighborhood and canyon trail system.

Carla Pisbe, Environmental Stewardship Coordinator. Carla is responsible for developing and implementing initiative components, working with partners, and conducting evaluations. She holds a B.A. in Politics and Latin American Latino Studies. Carla began her involvement with Ocean Discovery Institute as a student in Ocean Leaders in 2004. She utilizes her knowledge and fluency in Spanish to build meaningful relationships with the community members and ensure relevance of program content. Under her leadership, community ownership of City Heights Canyon has increased, with the majority of volunteers from the local community and the number of volunteers participating in more than one event increasing by 20% since 2004. With the Ocean Discovery Institute, Carla has led high school students in real-world research, studying the wetland ecosystems in Baja California.

December 17, 2013

Rare Trees and Vegetation Recovery

by

Tom Oberbauer

Hopefully you have been enjoying the articles by Tom Oberbauer over the last year in which he describes mini-expeditions in San Diego County to search for trees that are rare in this area and ephemeral phenomenon of a wet summer desert season.
As we all know, San Diego County is unique for its biological diversity but it is surprising that there are locations that remain remote and isolated for a county with over three million residents and major agricultural pursuits. 
This county supports species from the north and from the south and from the east in the desert regions.  
For the December program, Tom will highlight the explorations he has written about with visual images including the search for the Madrone, the search for Big-leaf maple and some views of desert monsoon. 
He will finish with a short set of photos from San Clemente Island illustrating a vegetation recovery that is just short of miraculous.

November 19, 2013

The Plants of Baja California: Diverse, Beautiful, & Fascinating

The Baja California peninsula is a narrow strip of land stretching for approximately 1,300 km in length and ranging from 45 km to 240 km in width. Its geographic position, latitudinal span, and topographic heterogeneity have conferred a diverse assemblage of weather regimes including a Mediterranean-type, winter rainfall climate; extreme arid, hot desert conditions; and tropical, summer rainfall patterns. In addition, the region's biogeographic history and physiognomy have resulted in a wide range of vegetation types including coastal sage scrub, chaparral, oak woodland, conifer forest, many desert scrub types, and tropical deciduous forest. The peninsula is also characterized by the presence of several islands varying in distance (<1 km to 240 km) from its coast, which are located in the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortés) and the Pacific Ocean. This piece of land and its adjacent islands support a wealth of species diversity in many different plant families. It is estimated that the flora consists of more than 4,000 plant taxa with approximately 30% of these known only from (endemic to) the Baja California region. Many of the plants from the peninsula and its islands are distinctive and stretch the imagination in respect to plant form and structure including the bizarre Boojum Tree/Cirio (Fouquieria columnaris), the giant Elephant Cactus/Cardón (Pachycereus pringlei), and elephant trees (Pachycormus discolor and Bursera spp.).

Jon P. Rebman, Ph.D., has been the Mary and Dallas Clark Endowed Chair/Curator of Botany at the San Diego Natural History Museum (SDNHM) since 1996. Dr. Rebman is a plant taxonomist and conducts extensive floristic research in Baja California and in San Diego and Imperial counties. He leads various field classes and botanical expeditions each year and is actively naming and describing new plant species from our region. His primary research interests have centered on the systematics of the Cactus family in Baja California, especially the genera Cylindropuntia (chollas) and Opuntia (prickly-pears). However, Dr. Rebman also does a lot of general floristic research and he co-published the most recent edition of the Checklist of the Vascular Plants of San Diego County. He has over 23 years of field experience with surveying and documenting plants including rare and endangered species. As a field botanist, he is a very active collector of scientific specimens with his personal collections numbering over 27,000. He is the director of the San Diego County Plant Atlas project and identifies/verifies all of the new specimens (currently over 62,000) coming into the herbarium through this scientific endeavor. As the curator of the SD Herbarium at the SDNHM, he is in charge of this dried plant specimen collection that contains over 228,000 specimens dating back to the 1870s. Dr. Rebman recently finished a new edition of the Baja California Plant Field Guide with co-author Norman Roberts that was published in June 2012. He is in the process of finishing another book entitled Ferns and Lycophytes of San Diego County that is co-authored with Annette Winner.

October 15, 2013


Anstine Audubon Nature Preserve - a Native Plant Success Story

This discussion details the habitat restoration efforts that have taken place at the Anstine Audubon Preserve located in Vista, Becky’s role with the Audubon Society, and the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) backyard habitat programs. She will discuss how the use of native plants has benefited birds and wildlife at Anstine, and its application to residential garden settings.

Becky Wilbanks, NWF-Certified Habitat Steward. Becky has been involved with the restoration of Anstine Preserve for the last 5 years. She currently works for the Imperial Girl Scouts Council as a Landscape Specialist, specifically for the development and implementation of native gardens at their Balboa site.

July 16, 2013

Orchids of Southern California


This discussion details the 16 species (7 genera) of orchids that grow within southern California, including their locations and habitats. The somewhat controversial topic of placing the well-known genus Piperia within Platanthera will also be discussed. This presentation is based on a publication that will be submitted by Dr. Lauri to Crossosoma later this year.

Robert Lauri, Ph.D. Botany, Claremont Graduate University and Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 2010.
His dissertation title was “A systematic study of Piperia (Orchidaceae) and close relatives in Platanthera s.l.
He currently works as an adjunct professor at San Diego State University teaching biology.

 

June 18, 2013

Native Plants at the San Diego Botanic Garden


The natural areas here include southern maritime chaparral, coastal sage scrub, and riparian areas. These and some of the significant species will be presented. Other native plant-related features here include our native plant garden, “California Gardenscapes,” the Fire Safety Garden, and our newly renovated Native Plants, and Native People Trail. Recently developed educational materials will be presented. The challenges of invasive species and their control will be described. Future plans include involvement with the Center for Plant Conservation working with state and federally listed species such as Del Mar Manzanita (Arctostaphylos glandulosa ssp. crassifolia), Encinitas baccharis (Baccharis vanessae) and Orcutt’s Hazardia (Hazardia orcuttii) as well as habitat restoration.

Dave Ehrlinger, B.A. geography, B.S. horticulture, has been Director of Horticulture at SDBG (formerly Quail Botanical Gardens)for for ten years. During this time I have been involved in the development of the native plant garden, fire safety garden and natural area management. I previously was involved in the Midwest in the design and management of several native plant gardens

May 21, 2013

Fire and Flora:
Stories of fire ecology in California shrublands and of new outreach efforts designed to engage hearts and minds through play

 

It is often said that California shrublands are adapted to fire. However, this deceptively simple statement hides a wealth of important detail. As a start, there are many different strategies for surviving fire. Some plant species have tough root systems, and quickly resprout after fire. Other species have smart seeds that detect the passage of fire, and only germinate when the coast is clear.  Yet it is a mistake to say that these species are adapted to fire. Really, they are not adapted to fire itself, but to patterns of fire, known as fire regimes. With the coming of modern society, urban development, and the resulting population boom, the Southern California fire regime has changed, and this change has dangerous consequences for California landscapes. One way to help protect native landscapes is through outreach. By doing outreach through play, we can simultaneously engage both hearts and minds, and be more effective agents of positive change.
In his talk, Tim will review some of the more interesting and pressing issues of Southern California fire ecology, and then introduce his new game, Fire and Flora, which is designed to teach these issues to the general public. Interested members, friends, and family are invited to attend a botanical gaming session on the day after the talk, at 11AM on 5/22 in room 104, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park (same place as the talk).


Tim Handley is an ecologist, educator, and game designer. He's spent most of the last four years working as a quantitative ecologist for the National Park Service, but has recently switched gears, and begun designing games to promote the understanding and appreciation of science and nature through play.

April 16, 2013
San Diego County Native Plants in the 1830s:
The San Diego collections of Coulter, Nuttall and HMS Sulphur with Barclay and Hinds

 

Matilija Poppy (genus Romneya), a plant first collected by Thomas Coulter in the San Diego region in 1832

Three expeditions of United Kingdom naturalists collected plants in the San Diego region in the 1830s: Mr. Lightner will discuss who these explorers were, how and why they came to the San Diego region, the plants they collected here, and the natural environment they observed in the 1830s. Images of original herbarium sheets will be presented. Mr. Lightner will also answer any questions about the 2011 edition of the field-guide, San Diego County Native Plants.

James Lightner, author of the local field-guide, San Diego County Native Plants (3d edition 2011). He will sign copies of the book purchased at the meeting

March 19, 2013
The California Native Landscape - an introduction to the new book from Greg Rubin and Lucy Warren

 

Whereas most native books have emphasized plant selection, this work is unique in its emphasis on native horticulture and design. In addition, this book emphasizes a Southern California perspective, with all its challenges. Success in our drier climate should translate well to the more moderate conditions north of us.   Subjects include soil biology, design techniques, garden styles, landscape installation, irrigation, maintenance, pests and diseases, and fire risk reduction. Be prepared to throw everything you were ever taught about ornamental horticulture out the window. Book signing will follow presentation (based on availability).

Greg Rubin has been working as a design/build native landscape contractor for over 19 years in southern California, with more than 600 installations to date. His work has been featured in many publications and media outlets.
Lucy Warren is a Master Gardener and well known regional gardening professional/author involved with many horticultural organizations and events. She was past editor of California Garden magazine.

February 19, 2013
Sahara Mustard Control Efforts in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park

Larry Hendrickson - Senior Park Aide at the Colorado Desert District of California State Parks



Sahara mustard (Brassica tournefortii), a non-native annual plant, has become a serious threat to the annual wildflower fields in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park and throughout the Southwestern United States. This talk will focus on practical experiences controlling the mustard in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park and the importance of educating the public to threats that all invasive weeds pose to our wildlands.    

Larry Hendrickson is a Senior Park Aide at the Colorado Desert District of California State Parks. He has worked over the last 15 years on non-native plant control within all of the parks within the District.  Larry is a self-taught botanist who has been studying plants in the San Diego backcountry for over 25 years.  He is also a field associate with the San Diego Natural History Museum Botany Department. 

January 15, 2013
San Diego Rare Plant Treasure Hunt: 
thoughts on a "breakable survey"

 

Speaker - Frank Landis


The San Diego Chapter participated in the CNPS Rare Plant Treasure hunt for the last three years.  Since there are insufficient resources and people to survey all the sensitive plants in the County, we have attempted to identify species that are "falling through the cracks," that have not been surveyed recently or thoroughly, and to survey these plants.  In performing these surveys, over thirty volunteers have found over fifteen million plants, and I will discuss our process and findings.
This work illuminates a bigger idea, which I call "the breakable survey."  Surveys are vulnerable to failures in survey protocols, vulnerable to loss of institutional memory through personnel turnover, and vulnerable to simple lack of communication among interested parties.  The idea of a "breakable survey" is to design a survey that will survive such failures, especially one that uses minimal resources.
In running the rare plant survey, I set out to create a "breakable survey," a program that I could hand off to other people with minimal loss of data and continuity.  I will use the details of the survey, from set up, through execution, to data distribution, to discuss what has and has not worked.  Information sharing has been the key to our successes.  Given the increasing limits on conservation resources, failure-proofing survey protocols will be an increasingly useful part of monitoring sensitive plant populations.

Frank Landis is the conservation and rare plant survey chair, and sits on the chapter board of directors.  He likes to promote t-shirt sales during chapter meetings and solicit donations for the state conservation campaign.  By training he is a botanist, with a PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a masters from Humboldt State University.

November 20, 2012
From the Headwaters to the River Mouth, conservation and stewardship of native plant habitats in the San Diego River watershed- 3 case studies

 

Speaker - by Shannon Quigley-Raymond, San Diego River Park Foundation

Conservation of native plant habitats and connecting the public with their value is one of the highlights of the River Park Foundation’s efforts to Create, Connect and Conserve the San Diego River watershed.
We do that through three avenues of engaging the public in their stewardship: headwaters conservation, urban open space restoration, and community native plant gardens. 
This presentation will focus on 3 sites, one from each type; the audience is encouraged and will learn how to participate in an upcoming urban riparian re-vegetation project in December. 
Eagle Peak Preserve is a 516 acre nature preserve owned by the San Diego River Park Foundation.
While primarily Coastal Sage Scrub, EPP also contains oak woodland (including Engelmann Oak (quercus engelmannii), native grassland, chaparral, and riparian habitats.
In 2007, fire burned approximately 85% of the Preserve. We will share results and photographs from the newly completed 5-year fire recovery photo monitoring completed on November 10, 2012.  
Our Friends of the River Mouth group care for and conserve the coastal dune habitat at the River’s Mouth and have revived and protect a previously undocumented population of Salt Marsh Bird’s Beak (Chloropyron maritimum ssp. maritimum). 
The Point Loma Native Plant Garden hosts a variety of native plant species as well as our native plant nursery and is the base for our newest effort, Home to Nature, a program to engage youth in growing native plants for habitat restoration projects in the watershed. 
  
Shannon Quigley-Raymond, Healthy River Healthy Communities Program CoordinatorIs a San Diego native with a B.S. Environmental Systems: Ecology, Behavior and Evolution, from UCSD, and has been with the Foundation for 5 years.  She is involved in riparian habitat restoration, invasive non-native citizen plant surveys, biological monitoring, and habitat assessments for the Foundation’s conservation lands.   

October 16, 2012
Ceanothus in San Diego County
Threats and Endemism

 

Speaker - Jim Rocks

Ceanothus is a diverse North American genus in the Rhamnaceae, whose members occur in habitats ranging from sub-tropical rainforests to snow covered ridgelines. 
California, with its climatic, edaphic, and topographical diversity, is the center of the distribution of Ceanothus with more than 80% of known taxa. 
The remarkable variety of habitats in San Diego County support at least 17 Ceanothus taxa, several of which are endemic to the region. 
The ecological complexity of the genus and its distribution within the County will be discussed followed by a focus on the endemic and near-endemic Ceanothus taxa within the region (C. cyaneus, C. otayensis, C. verrucosus, C. ssp. nov.). 
These species have unique distributions and life histories and face challenges and threats due in large part to urbanization and population growth. 
The wide variety of Ceanothus species and cultivars for the garden and landscape will also be briefly discussed. 

Jim Rocks is an independent biologist in San Diego with over 13 years experience working throughout California and is a Botany Department Associate at the San Diego Natural History Museum.  Through the Museum, he has taught classes on several plant families in San Diego County.  Of particular interest is the Rhamnaceae because of its wide distribution, unique and beautiful species, and rare taxa.

September 25, 2012
Experience the Inaugural 2012
San Diego Native Garden Tour

 

Speaker - Susan Krzywicki

The California Native Plant Society (CNPS) San Diego County Chapter hosted the first annual CNPS San Diego Native Garden Tour, sponsored by Hunter Industries, on April 28 and 29, 2012. The two-day, self-guided tour offered exclusive access to 25 unique home gardens, private nature parks, art gardens, restoration landscapes, and public botanical gardens. The event was the region’s largest public open house of native gardens and featured on-site lectures by native landscape designers as well as expert docents who interpreted each garden.

Gardens showcased in the 2012 CNPS San Diego Native Garden Tour extended from Fallbrook to Chula Vista and were designed by landscape architects, landscape designers, master gardeners, and garden enthusiasts.

Over 550 registrants attended and the feedback was excellent.

Now you can see highlights from the tour and learn how the event was received in the press, the public and amongst professionals and homeowners. Join us for a virtual tour of the properties and the event.

Susan Krzywicki, Chair of the CNPS SD Chapter Gardening Committee will present. Our gardening Committee formed several years ago and the high-profile project we identified was a Native Garden Tour. The tour took a tremendous group effort and I look forward to sharing our experiences with you.

July 17, 2012
The Live Forevers of San Diego County & adjacent Southern California and Baja California, Mexico

 

Speaker - Fred Roberts

The live forevers, members of the genus Dudleya, are a popular and easily recognized group of succulent plants.  They have been assigned to one of three groups depending on whether their flowers are united into a tube or open and star-like, originate from underground corms or form rosettes of either flattened or finger shaped leaves.  Of the about 45 species are found in southwestern North America.  About 25 percent of these are found in San Diego County.  If you expand that area to include mainland Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, and northern Baja California south to Cabo Colonet, the region includes well over half of all known species. 
 
Many live forevers are narrow endemics often found in dramatic settings along cliffs, sea bluffs, and vanishing landscapes.  If you have seen them in flower, you know they are a delight to find and observe.  Tonight, join Fred Roberts, the Chapter Rare Plant Botanist, as he tells us about this interesting group of plants.  Learn something about which habitats we can expect to find them, their rarity status, the characters used to separate them, and the diversity of forms growing within our region.

 

Fred Roberts previously worked as an Assistant Herbarium Curator at UC, Irvine and a botanists for the US Fish and Wildlife Service but is now an botanical consultant, author, and artist.  Fred is better known for his work on Orange County plants and oaks but he has always had a passion for the genus Dudleya.


June 19, 2012
Border Field Restoration

 

Speaker - Phil Roullard

Border Field Restoration
The presentation gives a brief history of the impacts that have occurred at Border Field State Park from natural influences, agriculture, the military and DHS infrastructure construction projects.

Using aerial images and  images that illustrate the above impacts, a short explanation is given as to what events have led to the alteration of the habitat at Border Field and what has and is being done in order to restore the habitat of a five acre parcel of land with native plants using community sourced volunteer labor. 

Phillip Roullard has worked for California State Parks for the last 11 years.  For the last six  years Phil has worked at Border Field removing invasive plants, then restoring habitat by revegetating with native plants.


May 15, 2012
Awakening the Wildness Within

 

Speaker - Rick Halsey

Join us to discover and explore what led Everett Ruess to write, "During the last few weeks, I've have been having the time of my life. Much of the time I feel so exuberant that I can hardly contain myself. The colors are so glorious, the forests so magnificent, the mountains so splendid, and the streams so utterly, wildly, tumultuously, effervescently joyful that to me at least, the world is a riot of intense sensual delight." We all have stories to tell about why a favorite natural place, a particular species, or our personal alchemist inspires us. It's time to consider those stories, to rejoice in the lessons nature can offer, and  embrace the wildness within.

Our presenter, Richard W. Halsey, is a photographer, writer, and director of the California Chaparral Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving native shrubland habitats throughout the world and supporting the creative spirit as inspired by the natural environment.
Mr. Halsey has been a teacher of natural history for over thirty years.


April 17, 2012
On The Brink:
The Ten Most Endangered Plants In San Diego County

Speaker - Vince Scheidt


San Diego County, near the southern end of the California Floristic Province, has long been recognized as one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots. The County’s rich botanical diversity includes an extraordinary number of rare plant species, some of which have become critically endangered due to the region’s extreme growth during the 20th Century. This presentation will describe the ten most endangered plants in San Diwego County, all of which are bear extinction in the wild, based on an analysis of relevant data sources and the presenter’s thirty years of local field experience.

Vince Scheidt has been a local environmental biologist for over 30 years. He is a member of the CNPS State Board of Directors and the Chair of the 2012 Conservation Conference Committee. He is also a recovering herpetologist.


March 20, 2012
Watershed Avengers

Speaker - Carla Pisbe

Watershed Avengers

The Ocean Discovery Institute empowers young people from urban and diverse backgrounds to create safe and healthy habitats. These efforts focus on City Heights’ canyons, where the community is actively transforming nature into safe and healthy places for urban youth to play, learn and explore. 

Carla Pisbe is the Environmental Stewardship Coordinator at Ocean Discovery Institute. Her work engages the community she grew up in, involving toddlers through seniors in science and conservation programs. She holds a B.A. in Politics and Latin American Latino Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. 


February 21, 2012
Archaeoethnobotany: Plants in San Diego's Archaeological Past

Speaker - Dr. G. Timothy Gross

This presentation will examine what archaeologists have found in the archaeological record in the San Diego region that informs us about the use of native plants.  Stone and ceramic artifacts give clues to plant use, and the remains of plants help to fill in the story.  Charred seeds, charcoal, pollen and phytoliths give information on plants used by prehistoric Native Americans, as well as those used in the historic period.  Although food is the most often considered aspect of ethbnobotany, other aspects of plant use such as their use as building material, firewood, and mastics will also be discussed.  The San Diego area will be compared to other areas like the Southwest and Great Basin where much more detail is preserved in the archaeological record about the interaction of plants and humans.

Dr. Gross earned his bachelor's in Anthropology from San Diego State University.  His masters and doctorate are from Washington State University.  He has been involved in the archaeology of the Western US for over 40 years.  He teaches at the University of San Diego and consults for Ecology and Environment, Inc.


January 17, 2012
San Diego Canyonlands - Current and Future Activities

The presentation will focus on two main topics. The first is SDCL’s proposal to dedicate approximately 10,000 acres of city-owned land for permanent open space and parkland. His second topic will be about aspects of their Canyon Enhancement Planning (CEP) Committee, created in 2009, as a guide for community stakeholders that facilitates a systems approach for integrating our natural open spaces with the fabric of the urban environment. These aspects include visual and physical canyon access, restoration, preservation, environment-based education and ecologically sensitive recreation. The pilot for the program is Manzanita Canyon in City Heights and the on-the-ground benefits are already materializing.


Eric Bowlby, a Massachusetts native, moved to San Diego in 1976. He got involved in environmental activism when he and a group of SDSU Urban Planning students started  a non-profit to oppose the trolley route through the wetlands in Mission Valley. He served as Executive Chair of the Sierra Club, San Diego Chapter in 1999 and 2000 and stepped down to take a part time job running the Sierra Club’s San Diego Canyons Campaign.  In 11 years Bowlby built the Canyons Campaign to three full-time staff positions and developed over 45 neighborhood-based friends groups for San Diego's canyons and creeks.  In 2008, along with several other community leaders, Bowlby established a new non-profit, San Diego Canyonlands, dedicated to restoration, preservation and protection of San Diego’s wonderful canyons.  Bowlby has also served for over eight years on the City of San Diego Wetlands Advisory Board and the City’s Open Space/Canyons Advisory Board.


November 15, 2011
Adventures with the Popcorn Flowers:
Cryptantha
(Boraginaceae)

This talk will present recent studies summarizing aspects of taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of the genus Cryptantha and close relatives. The methodology, evidence, and rationale for splitting the genus into five separate genera, all named by previous workers decades ago, will be explained. Current studies and some preliminary results with regard to species and infraspecies definition, including some recent discoveries will be presented.

Michael Simpson, Professor of Biology, San Diego State University. PhD, Duke University. Expertise: plant systematics, including phylogenetic relationships of flowering plants, taxonomy related to species and infraspecies delimitation, and floristic studies.

 


October 18, 2011
San Diego Botanic Garden

The San Diego Botanic Garden, previously known as Quail Botanical Garden, covers 37 acres in Encinitas. It first opened to the public in 1971. It features a diverse variety of plants and displays that include native and exotic environments. Four miles of trails lead visitors to explore and observe examples of plant species from around the world. Many improvements have been made to increase the visitor’s experience. These include a native plant demonstration gardens entitled “California Garden Scapes”, and two children’s gardens, “Seeds of Wonder” and the “Hamilton Children’s Garden”. Continued attendance and visitation by the public is most important to the Garden’s mission: To Inspire People of All Ages to Connect with Plants and Nature.

Julian Duval has been the director (President / CEO) of the San Diego Botanic Garden since 1995. He will provide a visual tour of the Garden and highlight how it has grown and improved over time.


September 20, 2011
Discover California Grasslands

Koeleria

In a state with towering redwoods, majestic oaks, vernal pools and other more "charismatic" plant communities, grasslands are often overlooked while right at our feet. In this information packed presentation you will learn that grasslands are very productive and diverse biologically, and provide numerous ecosystem services that benefit humans and natural systems alike. Yet today, less than 2% of our native grassland heritage remains.

The focus of the presentation is on five components of what make California grasslands special and unique: California grassland tremendous plant and animal diversity, what are grasses?, the ecosystem values and services of grasslands, restoration and landscaping with native grasses, and the important work of the California Native Grasslands Association. Emphasis will be on southern California grasslands and their diversity.

Zachary Principe is a biologist with The Nature Conservancy with 16 years of experience working with grasslands at Santa Rosa Plateau, Ramona Grasslands and in Kern County.  As a result of his interest in grassland ecology and conservation, he has been on the California Native Grassland Association board since 2008.


 

July 19, 2011
Protecting and Restoring Sensitive Vegetation Communities on the San Dieguito Watershed


Speaker - Leslie Woolenweber

Protecting and Restoring Sensitive Vegetation Communities on the San Dieguito Watershed, by Leslie Woollenweber

The San Dieguito Watershed is the fourth largest in San Diego County, stretching from the Volcan Mountain Ridge north of Julian to the ocean between Del Mar and Solana Beach.  Largely undeveloped and comprising large areas of protected open space, the watershed provides wonderful examples of mixed conifer forest, oak woodland, chaparral, coastal sage scrub, freshwater wetlands and intertidal marsh.  From Englemann oaks to short-leaved dudleya, many special status, rare and endemic plants can be found here. 

Non-native plant and animal species, human encroachment and catastrophic wildfire also threaten the watershed’s most fragile vegetation communities.  Stakeholders across the region are cooperating in large-scale efforts to battle invasives, restore wildlife habitat and preserve rare plant populations.  The presentation will describe the beautiful natural landscapes from the headwaters of the San Dieguito River to the beach, great places to experience scenic vistas and wildflowers, and the multi-million dollar effort to protect the special nature of the San Dieguito River Valley.

Leslie Woollenweber is Director of Conservation Programs with the San Dieguito River Valley Conservancy and has worked for the Conservancy for 5 years.  She chairs the San Dieguito Invasives Management Group, oversees the Conservancy’s large-scale invasives removal projects and supervises its youth-oriented volunteer program with a focus on habitat restoration.

 

June 21, 2011
Native Plant Gardens for the Public to Enjoy

 

7:00 - 8:00pm

CNPS San Diego Chapter June general membership meeting will be held at the Old Town State Historic Park Native Plant Garden, instead of being held in the usual Casa del Prado.

This program is dedicated to people who have helped establish public native plant gardens around the County, to let them share their experiences. Small exhibits will be set up around the Old Town Native Plant Garden, so attendees can visit with these "public gardeners" who will explain and illustrate their projects from around the county. Several volunteers will also lead groups of 4-6 people on ten minute walkabouts around the Old Town Native Plant Garden, with handouts explaining what this particular garden has achieved so far, and what it is hoping to become in time.

Our monthly meeting happens to fall on the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, so the sun won't set until 7:58 PM! Refreshments will be available (donations accepted!) and popular native plant horticulture books and general interest books about native plant identification will be sold.

The Native Plant Garden is at the west end of Old Town State Park, at the corner of Taylor and Congress Streets. This is across the street from the Old Town bus/trolley/train MTS station, so if you use public transportation you will be right there. If you drive, free parking is located beside the garden, off Taylor and Calhoun Streets, and a second free lot is a short walk away, in the State Park on the north side of Congress Street a bit west of Pizza Bella. From that parking lot, walk uphill, turn left at the restrooms, and go past the white two-story white McCoy House until you get to the main part of the Native Plant Garden, where the exhibits and walking tours will be held.


May 17, 2011
Reimagining the California Lawn:
Water-Conserving Plants, Practices and Designs




Speaker - Bart O'Brien

Bart O'Brien returns again to the delight of San Diego CNPS members. He will present an overview of the newly published book "Reimagining The California Lawn" of which Bart is co-author. Books will be available for sale and signing by the author after his presentation.
 
Bart O'Brien was Director of Horticulture  at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden for most of the past decade. His position is now Director of Special Projects, This world-renowned public garden in Los Angeles County is where
California native plants have been studied, grown, and promoted to use in Southern California landscapes since the early 1900's.
 
Bart is also co-author of two recent books: the award-winning California Native Plants for the Garden (2005), and the bilingual Care & Maintenance of Southern California Native Plant Gardens - Cuidado y mantenimiento de jardines de plantas nativas del sur de California (2006).The energetic Bart O'Brien also served admirably as the editor-in-chief of Fremontia, the quarterly botanical journal of the California Native Plant Society, between 2005 and 2010.


April 19, 2011 - Three Restoration Success Stories


Speakers - Mel Hinton, David Kimball and Jim Peugh

This program will look at three separate habitat restoration projects, each with its own story. Somewhat different approaches were used in the restoration process because of issues with land ownership, physical characteristics of the sites, and general preferences by those managing the restoration. Each project moved from invasive eradication, to planting, to post planting care and finally long term maintenance and weed control. Almost all of the work was done by volunteers. 
The presenters are Jim Peugh, David Kimball and Mel Hinton.

Of the three projects, Famosa Slough has the longest history going from a badly degraded wetland about to be developed in the 1970’s, to a thriving habitat for native vegetation, birds, and other wildlife. The 37-acre Slough straddles West Point Loma Boulevard just east of Nimitz and is managed by the San Diego Park Department with help from Friends of Famosa Slough. 
Jim Peugh is Chairman of the Board of that organization.

David Kimball oversees the restoration of Sunset Cliffs Natural Park in Point Loma as Chair of the Revegetation Committee for the Sunset Cliffs Recreation Council. This 68-acre park overlooks the Pacific Ocean along the western edge of Point Loma. What was once a weedy field dominated by crown daisies is now filled with native plants and birds. Much more work remains, but the side by side comparison of restored and un-restored land is striking.

Mel Hinton’s involvement with native plants began by creating a mini wildlife habitat in his backyard. He now supervises the restoration of former agricultural land at a 11½-acre nature preserve near Vista owned by the San Diego Audubon Society (SDAS).  The property has a 1½-acre pond, coastal sage scrub and oak/willow riparian woodland habitat. Kay Stewart developed the original restoration plan which was initially implemented by Claude Edwards.  Many kinds of wildlife have been sighted at the Anstine-Audubon Nature Preserve, including 100 different bird species.

Co-presenters Mel Hinton, David Kimball and Jim Peugh are all members of CNPS and Friends of Famosa Slough. They also are active members of the San Diego Audubon Society (SDAS) and have worked on numerous habitat restoration projects managed by the local Audubon chapter. All have been on the Board of Directors of SDAS for a number of years.

 


North San Diego County Satellite Meeting
Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center, 1580 Cannon Road, Carlsbad.

 

March 30, 2011 - Butterfly Gardening as Back-Yard Conservation and the Migration of Monarch Butterflies in San Diego County

Speaker - Seiko Sudo

Learn about the butterfly life cycle, interesting butterfly behaviors, and how to attract these loveliest of pollinators to your garden by using native plants.  Also, learn how you can contribute to the conservation effort of saving monarch butterflies in your own garden.

Seiko Sudo graduated from Humboldt State University with Bachelor’s degree in Wildlife in 2005. For the past six years, she has worked as an Interpretive Specialist for the Monarch Program, a research and education program using the monarch butterfly as an educational model to learn more about our local environment. The Monarch Program educates teachers, visitors, and children about butterfly gardening in San Diego County.
Directions to Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center: Exit I-5 east @ Cannon Road, turn left at Faraday Ave. signal into driveway (Thomas Guide 1126 J-1).


March 15, 2011 - San Diego County Plant Atlas Project:

Seven Years and 50,000 specimens later,
the payoffs are beginning to pour in!

Speaker - Dr. Jon Rebman


 
Even as the Plant Atlas project continues to bring in new specimens and data from around our county, the accumulation of information to date has reached a level that is useful in answering scientific questions.
 
Jon Rebman will tell all about how this new data is giving us an understanding of the ecology and biogeography of plant species, unraveling taxonomic mysteries, and revealing new information about our plants. Learn about the resources that are available on the Plant Atlas website for mapping and identifying the county’s plants. And hear about how the tools developed for this project are now being applied to botanical research in Baja California.
 
 
Biography
Jon P. Rebman, Ph.D., Curator of Botany, San Diego Natural History Museum.
Dr. Rebman has a doctorate in botany and is a taxonomist specializing in the flora of Southern California and Baja California. He leads various field classes and expeditions each year and is actively naming new plant species from our region. Dr. Rebman has been the Curator of Botany at SDNHM for the last 15 years. For more information visit http://www.sdnhm.org/research/botany/rebman.html


February 15, 2011 - What The Heck Is A List 1.B Species?

An overview of rare plants in San Diego
                                                                                       

Speaker - Frank Landis

San Diego County has 2,143 plant species, more than any other county in the contiguous United States.  Among this botanical plethora are (sadly) about 260 rare plant species. But not all rare plants are the same.  Some are rarer than others (the list 1.B species of the title), and some are, well, weirder than others.  This talk will cover the four different lists that CNPS groups rare plants into, and will discuss some of the different factors that make plants rare, with illustrations from San Diego's plants. 

Biography
Presenter Frank Landis has been a member of CNPS for almost 20 years.  Currently he is the rare plant chairman for the San Diego Chapter.  A trained botanist, he has a masters from Humboldt State University and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 


January 18, 2011 - The El Monte Valley Project

                                                                                        Speaker - Tim Smith
The Helix Water District is pursuing a new visionary water project along a portion of the San Diego River known as the ‘El Monte Valley Project’. The Project as currently envisioned has three major components, producing purified water, riverbed and habitat restoration, and a period of surface / sand mining.

Biography
This presentation will be given by Tim Smith, a Principal Engineer at Helix Water District the Project Manager, he is responsible for the planning, design, and right of way sections of the Engineering Department. Mr. Smith has more than 20 years of engineering experience and has been with the District for more than five years. He has Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Civil Engineering from San Diego State University.


North San Diego County Satellite Meeting
Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center, 1580 Cannon Road, Carlsbad.

 

January 12, 2011 - Public Participation and the Environmental Process

Speaker - Megan Wnright

The purpose of the California Environmental Quality Act includes disclosing to the public the significant environmental effects of a proposed discretionary project and enhancing public participation in the environmental review process. As a member of CNPS and a citizen of the state of California, you have the right have your voice heard. Join us and learn how to effectively communicate your concerns about preventing or minimizing damage to botanical resources.

Megan Enright is a senior project manager at Dudek, a local environmental consulting firm, and has 13 years’ experience in environmental planning, specializing in biological resource analyses for environmental documents, regulatory compliance, and botanical surveying. Ms. Enright serves as the botanical services manager for Dudek and is trained and skilled in botanical surveying.

Directions to Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center, 1580 Cannon Rd, Carlsbad: Exit I-5 east @ Cannon Road, turn left at Faraday Ave. signal into driveway.


November 16, 2010 - Where the Native Plants are in Balboa Park

                                                                                        Speaker - Zana Kerr, Park Ranger


Our November monthly meeting program will be presented by Zana Kerr, Park Ranger at Balboa Park. Her presentation focuses on areas in the Park where native habitats persist and places where native plants are being restored. The appearance of Balboa Park is continually changing as native plants are being established to improve and increase habitat areas. Thanks to a new partnership between C.N.P.S., Park Rangers, and the Kate Sessions Nursery, an array of native plants are being made available to City Parks for habitat recovery and enhancement. Volunteers will provide assistance in propagating plants at such places as at the native plant demonstration garden at Morley Field and within Florida Canyon.

Biography
 
Zana Kerr is originally from Dublin, Ireland with a BSc. from University College Dublin; and certificates from the National Conservation Education Center in Wicklow; Ireland. Her work experiences include 10 years with the City of San Diego at Mission Bay Park, Chollas Lake Park, Balboa Park, Presidio Park, Mission Hills Park and Otay Valley Regional Park. She has also worked for the County of San Diego Park and Recreation Department and San Diego Canyoneers


North San Diego County Satellite Meeting

 

November 10, 2010 - Habitats and Flora of Carlsbad's Lake Calavera and Calavera Heights Preserves

Speaker - James Dillane

Five years ago CNPS was asked by Preserve Calavera to lead a native plant hike in these preserves. James volunteered for what became an annual event and was so taken by the area's unique geography that he embarked on a study of the plants and habitats of the two preserves, particularly the rare and unusual species. Mt. Calavera is an ancient volcanic neck and the plants in the area range from salt marsh species to rare and unusual clay and maritime chaparral endemics.

Directions to Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center, 1580 Cannon Rd, Carlsbad: Exit I-5 east @ Cannon Road, turn left at Faraday Ave. signal into driveway.


October 19, 2010 - The Goldspotted Oak Borer - A New Non-Native Pest in California

                                                                                        Speaker - Kim Camilli

There has been significant oak tree mortality in San Diego County for that past several years. Initially the mortality was thought to be caused by drought, but the recent discovery of the non-native Goldspotted oak borer (Agrilus coxalis; a.k.a. GSOB) as the cause of the tree mortality has brought many researchers together to investigate more about this insect and other possible associated problems. This talk will focus on the biology, epidemiology, possible management options, and education outreach for this new insect pest.

Biography

Kim Camilli, is from upstate New York. She received her Bachelors of Science in Natural Resources Management and Environmental Forest Biology from SUNY ESF at Syracuse and her Masters of Science from Texas A&M in plant pathology. She has worked as a forest pathologist in Texas, Nevada and now Central and Southern California.


 

September 21, 2010 - Cedros and Guadalupe Islands:  Pacific Coast Islands with diverse and unique species and habitats.

Speaker - Thomas A. Oberbauer

Isla Cedros is the largest of the California and Baja California Islands.  While it lies within an arid climatic region where the lowland seasonal rainfall is only 85mm., it contains stunningly sharp environmental gradients on the upper elevations which range up to 1,194m.  This has resulted in presence of a diversity of vegetation community associations. These range from sarcocaulescent desert, made up of succulent-stem trees and shrubs, to coastal sage scrub, chaparral and maritime pine forest typical of southern and central Alta California.  Because of the fog enhanced climatic conditions, the gradient between the pine forest and desert is particularly steep.  The Island supports approximately 230 native taxa with those representing a flora from the north including Alta California, a number representing a flora from the south and roughly a dozen may be endemic.

Isla Guadalupe was discovered in 1602.  Seal hunters and mariners released goats onto the island in the early 1800’s.  They ravaged the vegetation for nearly 200 years growing in population to nearly 50,000 animals.  Their impacts resulted in the extinction, extirpation and near extinction of species of plants and several endemic varieties of birds.  It appeared that all hope was lost until a cooperative effort between several agencies in the Mexican Government and conservation groups worked over a period of 6 years to remove the goats entirely from the island.  Since the removal of the goats and prior to it as the numbers were greatly reduced, the vegetation has begun to show signs of natural recovery.  Shrubs that were confined to a few individuals on cliff sides are now appearing in widespread clusters over the upper reaches of the island.  Endemic pines and cypress that appeared doomed to extinction are reproducing with thousands of seedlings.  Barren slopes are now becoming covered with bushes and a mixture of annual grasses with Mediterranean origins but also native annual herbs.  Shrubs that had not been seen in more than 100 years have appeared in open lands indicating that even after 100 years, a seed reserve still resides in the eroded remnants of the soil.  While much of the vegetation has not yet assembled itself into real community associations, its reestablishment appears promising.  With the growth of vegetation, there are new challenges including the issue of fire, but with appropriate management, the vegetation appears to be growing back at a rate that is greater than what would be expected. 

Biography

Thomas A. Oberbauer – Tom is a third generation San Diegan and was educated in local schools with a Master’s Degree from San Diego State University.  He has been a member of the San Diego Chapter of the California Native Plant Society for 35 years and past chapter president and director at large.  He has also worked for the County of San Diego for nearly 35 years and is currently Chief of the Multiple Species Conservation Planning Division where he supervises the preparation and implementation of the regional preserve system in this County.  Since 1998, approaching 40,000 acres of land have been preserved under this program. 
Tom has had a long interest in the islands of California and Baja California first visiting them in the mid 1970’s.  


July 20, 2010 - Watershed Avengers: engaging urban and diverse communities in habitat restoration through youth leadership

Speaker - Dylan Edwards

Watershed Avengers is a program of Ocean Discovery Institute and is lead by a team of eight students from Hoover High School.  These students engage, educate and inspire the community of City Heights to steward and restore their local canyons, watersheds, and habitats. Over the last two years, this program has connected over 2,000 volunteers in the restoration of Swan Canyon.  The community has transformed what was once a canyon degraded by invasive plants, trash, and illegal activity, to a community resource where people can reconnect with nature and learn about native plants and animals. Come learn about our recent success, our exciting next steps in the project, and how you can get involved.
 
Dylan Edwards is the Environmental Stewardship Coordinator for Ocean Discovery Institute and is the instructor for the team of high school students who lead Watershed Avengers. He received his B.S. in Outdoor Recreation at San Diego State University and focused on outdoor leadership and connecting underserved populations to nature and the outdoors.  He is currently a Graduate Student at Prescott College studying Restoration Ecology and Planning. He has been a CNPS member for just under a year.


North San Diego County Satellite Meeting

June 30, 2010 - The Live-Forevers

Speaker - Fred Roberts

The live-forevers, members of the genus Dudleya, are a popular and easily recognized group of succulent plants. Of the about 45 species, most live in southern California and northern Baja California, Mexico. Among the live-forevers are many narrow endemics and rare species. Some are obscure, others dramatic. Join Fred Roberts, the San Diego Chapter Rare Plant Botanist, as he talks about this interesting group of plants, where we can expect to see them, and introduces us to their diversity in San Diego County and adjacent areas. Fred is better known for his work on Orange County plants and oaks but he has has a passion for the genus Dudleya since he was an undergraduate at UCSB.

Directions to Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center, 1580 Cannon Rd, Carlsbad: Exit I-5 east @ Cannon Road, turn left at Faraday Ave. signal into driveway.


June 15, 2010 - Making the Most of the New Edition of the Manual of California Vegetation

Speaker - Dr. Todd Keeler-Wolf

The first Manual was published in 1995 as an introduction to a new way of defining and describing vegetation, the second edition, published by CNPS in the fall of 2009 presents a refined tool that distinguishes all of the currently known vegetation types in California. Just as importantly, it also uses the descriptions as a means to describe dynamic processes such as fire, flood, and climate change that shape the state’s biotic landscape.
In many ways the new book is part of the story of how vegetation description is contributing to conservation and sound management of California’s natural landscape. In this talk he will point out what information lies within the book, how to interpret it, and also what related activities are underway to provide integrated information on California vegetation.

Dr. Todd Keeler-Wolf is an ecologist who has worked in California for over 30 years. He is the Senior Vegetation Ecologist at the California Department of Fish and Game and lead’s their Vegetation Classification and Mapping Program. He is also technical program advisor to the California Native Plant Society’s Vegetation Program. In addition to the Manual of California Vegetation, he has co-authored several books and publications, including the revised UC Press California Plant Life Natural History guide (with Robert Ornduff and Phyllis Faber), and the recently published third edition of the Terrestrial Vegetation of California (with Michael Barbour and Allan Schoenherr).


 

May 18, 2010 - The Goodan Ranch/Sycamore Canyon Open Space Preserve

By Carol Crafts President of the Friends of Goodan Ranch
www.goodanranch.org

Managed by a Joint Powers Authority consisting of the California Department of Fish and Game, County of San Diego, and the cities of Poway and Santee, the Goodan Ranch - Sycamore Canyon Open Space Preserve encompasses varied and rugged terrain that supports some of southern California’s prominent and familiar plant communities. When you head south along Sycamore Canyon Road from Poway you will leave the busy world of our every day lives and find an oasis of history and peacefulness. The preserve offers opportunities to use your zoom lens as there are many birds and “belly flowers” to find and enjoy. Visitors may explore on foot, by mountain bike, or on horseback along a network of varied trails. Some trails are quite challenging but most are family friendly. You may encounter volunteers and Rangers maintaining trails, removing weeds or leading public hikes. Off trail, San Diego thorn-mint and other sensitive plants survive in hidden pockets. In the center of the valley are the remnants of the Goodan family’s stone house (1937 to 2003) which was destroyed during the Cedar Fire. Alongside it is the new visitor’s center where visitors can learn about homesteaders associated with an old school and post office referred as to ‘Stowe’ (1890 to 1905), and plans for the Trans County Trail. Bring a picnic to enjoy under the oaks and we may see one another there!

Carol Crafts is President of the Friends of Goodan Ranch, where she coordinates support for the Rangers and their public outreach activities. She is also a volunteer with two historical societies, the San Diego Tracking Team and Project Wildlife, as well as at the Blue Sky Ecological Reserve. She lives in Poway.


April 20, 2010 - Filming the Wilds of San Diego

By Jim Karnik Photographer/filmmaker

Jim Karnik, will give a presentation on filming San Diego’s incredible natural diversity for a new high definition habitat series.

The Wilds of San Diego is a proposal to produce, display and distribute a multi media project using digital photography and high definition video to increase public awareness and appreciation for the unique beauty of wild habitats and species in San Diego County. The series will focus on connections between wildlife, habitats and humans. The ultimate goal of this project is to reach as large an audience as possible using multiple media outlets including internet, broadcast, DVD and public presentation. The key to reaching a broader spectrum of the San Diego residents will be the use of traveling theater exhibits. These mobile theaters will be installed in public spaces such as visitor centers, libraries, public buildings and shopping malls.

Jim has been filming nature in San Diego for over 20 years. He has filmed most of the habitats and species in the county and is now excited to recapture the beauty and natural diversity of San Diego using the latest DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras which allow for both high definition video and high resolution still photography.

Accompanied by sample video clips from the new series, Jim will give an overview of San Diego’s major natural habitats and unique qualities. Since 1987 photographer/filmmaker, Jim Karnik has focused his efforts on helping conservation organizations increase public awareness of human and natural history through film, video and photography. Through close collaboration with clients, he strives to create video programs that inform, motivate and inspire.
For additional information and to view films on-line please visit www.fieldnotes.com


March 16, 2010 - A Conservation Puzzle: Members invited to hunt for San Diego thornmint

By Jonathan Snapp-Cook and Jessie Vinje

 In just a few short weeks the pink and white blooms of San Diego thornmint (Acanthomintha ilicifolia) will emerge from its green thorny foliage.  When surveying for this small annual you might feel the crunch of the crumbly clay soils or smell its wintergreen-like scent before seeing the plants. San Diego thornmint is limited in distribution to San Diego County and northwestern Baja California.  The species is only found on gently sloping clay lens habitat.  Jonathan Snapp-Cook will provide a virtual tour of some of the locations where this species is found and present the findings of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 5-year Review for San Diego thornmint.  Jessie Vinje will provide a first hand account of her work managing San Diego thornmint on three North County preserves.  Jonathan also hopes to lure in volunteers to our spring search for thornmint with tales of populations of greater than 30,000 beautiful plants and unique clay lens habitats scarcely the size of a kitchen table.  If you already know that you want to volunteer for our chapter’s spring surveys for San Diego thornmint please contact Frank Landis at franklandis03@yahoo.com.

Biographies
Jonathan Snapp-Cook is a botanist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Carlsbad.  He is interested in hard to find endemics and vernal pool flora and fauna. 

Jessie Vinje is a preserve manager and botanist with the Center for Natural Lands Management.  She manages preserves in Carlsbad and Encinitas.


February 16, 2010 - Edible, Medicinal, Material, Ceremonial: Contemporary Ethnobotany of Southern California Indians
By Rose Ramirez and Deborah Small

Native plants were an incredibly important part of Indigenous people’s daily life. Many of those plants had profound importance to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural vitality of California Indian people. This month’s presentation is an ethnobotanical calendar that documents the contemporary uses of twelve native plants. The presentation will include interviews, photographs, videos, and a multimedia presentation of southern California Indians as they gather, prepare, and use native plants. Don’t miss this important work.

Biography
Rose Ramirez is of Chumash descent, a California Indian basket weaver, photographer, and board member of the non-profit American Indian Channel, which documents the arts and culture of native peoples.

Deborah Small is an artist, photographer and professor of Visual and Performing Arts at California State University San Marcos and is the co-founder of the Indian Rock Native Garden Collaboration. She currently is working on a photographic book about southern California Indian basket weavers. For more see www.deborahsmall.wordpress.com


January 19, 2010 - Connecting Native Plants, People and Politics
by Ann Fege 

Native plants, nearby nature, and the work of CNPS are more important than ever, and this presentation will be a dialogue about the values of learning in nature and “playing” outdoors.  When people spend time “connecting to nature,” they are more likely to make personal lifestyle changes, participate in community projects, grasp the imperative of greenhouse gas reductions, and give political support for biodiversity.  When children spend time in nature and outdoor play, they are healthier and happier, develop their curiosity and creativity, get a sense of place, and learn about stewardship of the environment.  Locally, the San Diego Children and Nature Collaborative brings educators, ecologists, parents, community leaders and activists together and is inspired by local columnist Richard Louv, his book Last Child in the Woods, and the national “Children and Nature” movement. 

Biography

Anne Fege Ph.D., M.B.A, is co-founder of the San Diego Children and Nature Collaborative. Dr. Fege's thirty years of accomplishments in natural resources management encompass biodiversity and habitat conservation, wildfire ecology and education, urban forestry, wilderness management, wood energy research, community involvement, and nature education.  Fege is an adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at San Diego State University, Botany Research Associate at the San Diego Natural History Museum, a lifetime Girl Scout and volunteer, and retired Forest Supervisor of the Cleveland National Forest. 


November 17, 2009 -Update on San Diego’s Multiple Species Conservation Program
by Jared Underwood 

 San Diego County is home to many rare, threatened, and endangered species. On a national and global scale, the region has been identified as a major "hotspot" for biodiversity. It is also one of the most rapidly growing regions in the country. This combination of high biodiversity, large numbers of rare and unique species, and rapid urbanization has led to conflicts between growth and biological conservation. In the 1990s the County initiated a Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) for unincorporated areas of the County. The goal of this program was to develop comprehensive conservation plans that would allow for the conservation of biodiversity and continued growth within the County. The North County Plan (Plan) expands the MSCP into the northwestern unincorporated areas of the County. In this presentation we will outline the goals, objectives, and polices of the Plan that will allow for the streamlining future development outside of proposed preserve areas and for the conservation of rare and endangered species within the proposed preserve system.

Biography

Jared Underwood began working with the County of San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) in August of 2008. He currently is the lead planner/biologist for the MSCP North County Plan. He recently received a Ph.D. in Biology with a focus in Conservation Planning from Arizona State University and is excited to bring his passion for conservation to San Diego.
Jared has previously worked for the Arizona Game and Fish Department, Utah Department of Natural Resources, and the US Forest Service. In his spare time he enjoys surfing, scuba diving, hiking, and in general exploring the natural world around him.


October 20, 2009 - San Diego Canyonlands
by Eric Bowlby

Eric will talk about San Diego Canyonlands’ goals and programs and opportunities to support a vision of restoration and sustainable stewardship of San Diego’s unique habitats.  He will discuss current threats to wetlands and creek channels for the sake of flood control and solutions that could result in sustainable green infrastructure in the San Diego Region.

Biography

Eric Bowlby is a Massachusetts native who moved to San Diego in 1976 and earned Associates degrees in English and Computer Science from local Community Colleges.  He began his involvement in environmental issues in 1990 working to protect wetlands and other habitats along the San Diego River in western Mission Valley.  He became Coastal Committee Chair for the San Diego Chapter of Sierra Club in 1996 and served as Chair of the Chapter’s Executive Committee in 1999 and 2000.  He helped establish and build the Sierra Club’s San Diego Canyons Campaign from its inception in 1998 and in 2000 stepped down as chair to take a part time job managing the campaign.  He and the Canyons Steering Committee grew the campaign to three full time positions and established 40 new friends groups for canyons and creeks throughout San Diego.  In February 2008, with the Sierra Club’s blessing, Bowlby and the Steering Committee launched a new non-profit,  (San Diego Canyonlands, SDCL), dedicated to San Diego’s canyons. Bowlby was hired as Executive Director in August 2008.  Bowlby has also served for years on the City of San Diego Wetlands Advisory Board and the Open Space/Canyons Advisory Board.

 


September 22, 2009 - Save water....build habitat
by Mike Evans 

Many agencies and municipalities are introducing strict measures for mandatory water conservation, especially for outdoor use and landscape irrigation.  We are told about numerous ornamental plants that will "work" in the landscape to save water; plants which fit into the category "California Friendly."  The only plants that will truly use less irrigation water and also attract beneficial wildlife species are California native.  We will discuss why native plantings are the "friendliest" of the California Friendly" plants, and the crucial need before us to enhance and build wildlife habitat within the human environment.  

Biography
Mike Evans was born and raised in southern California.  In 1976, he co-founded Tree of Life Nursery, the largest native plant nursery in California. He has been active in many conservation, horticultural and botanical organizations.  He was past president (2005) of the International Plant Propagators Society, and past president (2001) of the California Society for Ecological Restoration.  He has been active in the California Native Plant Society, the California Botanical Society, and The Nature Conservancy and he served on the horticultural committee for The Jepson Manual project. He is on the board of the Donna O’Neill Land Conservancy in San Juan Capistrano, Casa Romantica Cultural Center in San Clemente, the San Juan Capistrano Historical Society, and the Reserve at Rancho Mission Viejo.


July 21, 2009 - Finding Connection in Nature
by John Muir Laws


Naturalist, educator and artist John (Jack) Muir Laws delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others. For six years, John Muir Laws backpacked the Sierra Nevada to research and illustrate The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, a richly illustrated (2,710 original watercolor paintings), pocket‐size field guide to over 1,700 species found in the Sierra Nevada. This guide helps visitors or residents of the Sierra understand and appreciate the biodiversity of the region.
Laws will present an illustrated lecture about the natural history of the Sierra Nevada, and the process of creating a field guide. This engaging program will highlight some of the beautifully and amazing species in the Sierra and the relationships between them. Laws will also discuss some of the conservation challenges in the Sierra Nevada and what stewards of nature are doing to confront them.

Biography
Naturalist, educator and artist John (Jack) Muir Laws delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others. For six years, John Muir Laws backpacked the Sierra Nevada to research and illustrate The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, a pocket size field guide to over 1,700 species found in the Sierra Nevada. The guide includes 2,710 original watercolor paintings was reviewed by educators, naturalists, and scientists throughout the country, and was intensively field tested by adults and youth. This guide helps visitors or residents of the Sierra understand and appreciate the biodiversity of the region. This comprehensive and easy to use guide allows botanists to identify the insects that come to their flowers, birders to identify the trees in which the birds perch, or hikers to identify the stars overhead at night. Laws is deeply committed to stewardship of nature and collaborates with organizations throughout the state to this end. He is currently coordinating efforts to create a standards based sixth through eighth grade curriculum to help teachers convey a love of nature and an understanding of biodiversity to their students through field studies and nature sketching. As a part of this project, he is working secure funding to donate sets of field guides to every middle and high school in the Sierra Nevada. Laws has worked as an environmental educator for over 25 years in California, Wyoming, and Alaska. He teaches classes on natural history, conservation biology, scientific illustration, and field sketching. He is trained as a wildlife biologist and is an associate of the California Academy of Sciences. His illustrations capture the feeling of the living plant or animal, while also including details critical for identification. In the summer of 2004, Laws published Sierra Birds: a Hiker's Guide. He is also a regular contributor to Bay Nature magazine with his "Naturalists Notebook" column.


June 16, 2009 - Native Landscape Myths and Legends
by Greg Rubin


This presentation challenges much of the conventional wisdom surrounding native plants with lots of photographic examples.  Greg also looks at many of the "Do's" and "Don'ts" of successful nativescapes, including an analysis of a huge, failing native installation (sorry, no names will be divulged).  Bring your questions.

Biography
Greg Rubin, owner of California's Own Native Landscape Design, started working with native plants back in 1985, while renovating his parent's home in Chatsworth, CA. Although educated and subsequently employed in a successful engineering career, Greg maintained a fascination with natives based on this early experience. Soon, he was landscaping for friends and family on weekends and holidays. Demand continued to rise, and by 1993, Greg was able to start his successful and unusual landscaping business. Since that time, his company has designed over 500 native landscapes in San Diego County.

Greg has been featured in a number of periodicals including the North County Times, Union Tribune, and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Home and Garden, San Diego Reader, and California Gardener. Media coverage includes appearances on KGTV, KUSI, and KFMB. He has also been a repeat guest on KPBS radio’s These Days with Tom Fudge. Greg regularly gives presentations on native plants to garden clubs and other organizations throughout San Diego County.

 


May 19, 2009 -Real California Natives: Experience the food, drink and medicine
by Kristie Orosco

The indigenous people of San Diego County have been using native plants for many thousands of years. These plants have significant meaning and are still commonly used for food, drink and medicine. This month’s presentation is a special opportunity for all of us to experience what many native people already know. Our meeting will begin with tasting three food items including Shaawii (acorn pudding), miners lettuce and chia seed mix.  We will also enjoy Manzanita berry tea, lemonade berry tea and chia energy drinks. And we will learn about and experience the medicinal use of elderberry, mistletoe wash and oak gall wash. Please note that some foods may be substituted, depending on harvest abundance and seasonal availability; however, every effort will be made to make the above mentioned plants and foods available.
All of us will be able to sample various items and learn a little about how they are prepared and used from the people whose ancestors have been appreciating native plants for a very long time.

Biography

Kristie Orosco is a member of the Kumeyaay Tribe and has lived on the San Pasqual Indian Reservation all of her life.  The Kumeyaay Tribe is the Indigenous Community of San Diego, who’s aboriginal territory spans from Northern Baja California to the San Dieguito/Margarita watersheds.  The San Pasqual Indian Reservation is situated in a coastal sage scrub and oak woodland community; this is where Kristie’s plant knowledge and inspiration was born.  Kristie’s interest in ethno-botany began over 20 years ago and continues today.  This interest in native plants and the environment has flowed over into her career path.  Since 1994 Ms. Orosco has manifested her life’s passion by working in the Tribal Environmental Protection field.   For ten years Kristie has been a Board Member of the Native American Environmental Protection Coalition.  Ms. Orosco has accomplished many projects and most currently is the Environmental Director for a local Tribal Government.   Her current position is gives her the opportunity to manage projects such as:  Development of a Tribal Sustainability Plan, Implementing a River Restoration Project, a Native Plant Trail and Interpretive Center project, management of a 150+ acre Endangered Species Habitat Preserve, Cultural Resources Protection Program,  Extensive Environmental Education Outreach and many others.    It is a goal of Ms. Orosco to advocate for the protection of San Diego’s rich biological diversity; because she is confident that this will compliment the protection of the cultural tradition and heritage of San Diego’s indigenous peoples.


September 22, 2009 - Save water....build habitat
by Mike Evans 

Many agencies and municipalities are introducing strict measures for mandatory water conservation, especially for outdoor use and landscape irrigation.  We are told about numerous ornamental plants that will "work" in the landscape to save water; plants which fit into the category "California Friendly."  The only plants that will truly use less irrigation water and also attract beneficial wildlife species are California native.  We will discuss why native plantings are the "friendliest" of the California Friendly" plants, and the crucial need before us to enhance and build wildlife habitat within the human environment.  

Biography
Mike Evans was born and raised in southern California.  In 1976, he co-founded Tree of Life Nursery, the largest native plant nursery in California. He has been active in many conservation, horticultural and botanical organizations.  He was past president (2005) of the International Plant Propagators Society, and past president (2001) of the California Society for Ecological Restoration.  He has been active in the California Native Plant Society, the California Botanical Society, and The Nature Conservancy and he served on the horticultural committee for The Jepson Manual project. He is on the board of the Donna O’Neill Land Conservancy in San Juan Capistrano, Casa Romantica Cultural Center in San Clemente, the San Juan Capistrano Historical Society, and the Reserve at Rancho Mission Viejo.

 


July 21, 2009 - Finding Connection in Nature
by John Muir Laws
Naturalist, educator and artist John (Jack) Muir Laws delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others. For six years, John Muir Laws backpacked the Sierra Nevada to research and illustrate The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, a richly illustrated (2,710 original watercolor paintings), pocket‐size field guide to over 1,700 species found in the Sierra Nevada. This guide helps visitors or residents of the Sierra understand and appreciate the biodiversity of the region.
Laws will present an illustrated lecture about the natural history of the Sierra Nevada, and the process of creating a field guide. This engaging program will highlight some of the beautifully and amazing species in the Sierra and the relationships between them. Laws will also discuss some of the conservation challenges in the Sierra Nevada and what stewards of nature are doing to confront them.

Biography
Naturalist, educator and artist John (Jack) Muir Laws delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others. For six years, John Muir Laws backpacked the Sierra Nevada to research and illustrate The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, a pocket size field guide to over 1,700 species found in the Sierra Nevada. The guide includes 2,710 original watercolor paintings was reviewed by educators, naturalists, and scientists throughout the country, and was intensively field tested by adults and youth. This guide helps visitors or residents of the Sierra understand and appreciate the biodiversity of the region. This comprehensive and easy to use guide allows botanists to identify the insects that come to their flowers, birders to identify the trees in which the birds perch, or hikers to identify the stars overhead at night. Laws is deeply committed to stewardship of nature and collaborates with organizations throughout the state to this end. He is currently coordinating efforts to create a standards based sixth through eighth grade curriculum to help teachers convey a love of nature and an understanding of biodiversity to their students through field studies and nature sketching. As a part of this project, he is working secure funding to donate sets of field guides to every middle and high school in the Sierra Nevada. Laws has worked as an environmental educator for over 25 years in California, Wyoming, and Alaska. He teaches classes on natural history, conservation biology, scientific illustration, and field sketching. He is trained as a wildlife biologist and is an associate of the California Academy of Sciences. His illustrations capture the feeling of the living plant or animal, while also including details critical for identification. In the summer of 2004, Laws published Sierra Birds: a Hiker's Guide. He is also a regular contributor to Bay Nature magazine with his "Naturalists Notebook" column.


June 16, 2009 - Native Landscape Myths and Legends
by Greg Rubin


This presentation challenges much of the conventional wisdom surrounding native plants with lots of photographic examples.  Greg also looks at many of the "Do's" and "Don'ts" of successful nativescapes, including an analysis of a huge, failing native installation (sorry, no names will be divulged).  Bring your questions.

Biography
Greg Rubin, owner of California's Own Native Landscape Design, started working with native plants back in 1985, while renovating his parent's home in Chatsworth, CA. Although educated and subsequently employed in a successful engineering career, Greg maintained a fascination with natives based on this early experience. Soon, he was landscaping for friends and family on weekends and holidays. Demand continued to rise, and by 1993, Greg was able to start his successful and unusual landscaping business. Since that time, his company has designed over 500 native landscapes in San Diego County.

Greg has been featured in a number of periodicals including the North County Times, Union Tribune, and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Home and Garden, San Diego Reader, and California Gardener. Media coverage includes appearances on KGTV, KUSI, and KFMB. He has also been a repeat guest on KPBS radio’s These Days with Tom Fudge. Greg regularly gives presentations on native plants to garden clubs and other organizations throughout San Diego County.


May 19, 2009 -Real California Natives: Experience the food, drink and medicine
by Kristie Orosco

The indigenous people of San Diego County have been using native plants for many thousands of years. These plants have significant meaning and are still commonly used for food, drink and medicine. This month’s presentation is a special opportunity for all of us to experience what many native people already know. Our meeting will begin with tasting three food items including Shaawii (acorn pudding), miners lettuce and chia seed mix.  We will also enjoy Manzanita berry tea, lemonade berry tea and chia energy drinks. And we will learn about and experience the medicinal use of elderberry, mistletoe wash and oak gall wash. Please note that some foods may be substituted, depending on harvest abundance and seasonal availability; however, every effort will be made to make the above mentioned plants and foods available.
All of us will be able to sample various items and learn a little about how they are prepared and used from the people whose ancestors have been appreciating native plants for a very long time.

Biography

Kristie Orosco is a member of the Kumeyaay Tribe and has lived on the San Pasqual Indian Reservation all of her life.  The Kumeyaay Tribe is the Indigenous Community of San Diego, who’s aboriginal territory spans from Northern Baja California to the San Dieguito/Margarita watersheds.  The San Pasqual Indian Reservation is situated in a coastal sage scrub and oak woodland community; this is where Kristie’s plant knowledge and inspiration was born.  Kristie’s interest in ethno-botany began over 20 years ago and continues today.  This interest in native plants and the environment has flowed over into her career path.  Since 1994 Ms. Orosco has manifested her life’s passion by working in the Tribal Environmental Protection field.   For ten years Kristie has been a Board Member of the Native American Environmental Protection Coalition.  Ms. Orosco has accomplished many projects and most currently is the Environmental Director for a local Tribal Government.   Her current position is gives her the opportunity to manage projects such as:  Development of a Tribal Sustainability Plan, Implementing a River Restoration Project, a Native Plant Trail and Interpretive Center project, management of a 150+ acre Endangered Species Habitat Preserve, Cultural Resources Protection Program,  Extensive Environmental Education Outreach and many others.    It is a goal of Ms. Orosco to advocate for the protection of San Diego’s rich biological diversity; because she is confident that this will compliment the protection of the cultural tradition and heritage of San Diego’s indigenous peoples.


September 22, 2009 - Save water....build habitat
by Mike Evans 

Many agencies and municipalities are introducing strict measures for mandatory water conservation, especially for outdoor use and landscape irrigation.  We are told about numerous ornamental plants that will "work" in the landscape to save water; plants which fit into the category "California Friendly."  The only plants that will truly use less irrigation water and also attract beneficial wildlife species are California native.  We will discuss why native plantings are the "friendliest" of the California Friendly" plants, and the crucial need before us to enhance and build wildlife habitat within the human environment.  

Biography
Mike Evans was born and raised in southern California.  In 1976, he co-founded Tree of Life Nursery, the largest native plant nursery in California. He has been active in many conservation, horticultural and botanical organizations.  He was past president (2005) of the International Plant Propagators Society, and past president (2001) of the California Society for Ecological Restoration.  He has been active in the California Native Plant Society, the California Botanical Society, and The Nature Conservancy and he served on the horticultural committee for The Jepson Manual project. He is on the board of the Donna O’Neill Land Conservancy in San Juan Capistrano, Casa Romantica Cultural Center in San Clemente, the San Juan Capistrano Historical Society, and the Reserve at Rancho Mission Viejo.


July 21, 2009 - Finding Connection in Nature
by John Muir Laws
Naturalist, educator and artist John (Jack) Muir Laws delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others. For six years, John Muir Laws backpacked the Sierra Nevada to research and illustrate The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, a richly illustrated (2,710 original watercolor paintings), pocket‐size field guide to over 1,700 species found in the Sierra Nevada. This guide helps visitors or residents of the Sierra understand and appreciate the biodiversity of the region.
Laws will present an illustrated lecture about the natural history of the Sierra Nevada, and the process of creating a field guide. This engaging program will highlight some of the beautifully and amazing species in the Sierra and the relationships between them. Laws will also discuss some of the conservation challenges in the Sierra Nevada and what stewards of nature are doing to confront them.

Biography
Naturalist, educator and artist John (Jack) Muir Laws delights in exploring the natural world and sharing this love with others. For six years, John Muir Laws backpacked the Sierra Nevada to research and illustrate The Laws Guide to the Sierra Nevada, a pocket size field guide to over 1,700 species found in the Sierra Nevada. The guide includes 2,710 original watercolor paintings was reviewed by educators, naturalists, and scientists throughout the country, and was intensively field tested by adults and youth. This guide helps visitors or residents of the Sierra understand and appreciate the biodiversity of the region. This comprehensive and easy to use guide allows botanists to identify the insects that come to their flowers, birders to identify the trees in which the birds perch, or hikers to identify the stars overhead at night. Laws is deeply committed to stewardship of nature and collaborates with organizations throughout the state to this end. He is currently coordinating efforts to create a standards based sixth through eighth grade curriculum to help teachers convey a love of nature and an understanding of biodiversity to their students through field studies and nature sketching. As a part of this project, he is working secure funding to donate sets of field guides to every middle and high school in the Sierra Nevada. Laws has worked as an environmental educator for over 25 years in California, Wyoming, and Alaska. He teaches classes on natural history, conservation biology, scientific illustration, and field sketching. He is trained as a wildlife biologist and is an associate of the California Academy of Sciences. His illustrations capture the feeling of the living plant or animal, while also including details critical for identification. In the summer of 2004, Laws published Sierra Birds: a Hiker's Guide. He is also a regular contributor to Bay Nature magazine with his "Naturalists Notebook" column.


June 16, 2009 - Native Landscape Myths and Legends
by Greg Rubin
This presentation challenges much of the conventional wisdom surrounding native plants with lots of photographic examples.  Greg also looks at many of the "Do's" and "Don'ts" of successful nativescapes, including an analysis of a huge, failing native installation (sorry, no names will be divulged).  Bring your questions.

Biography
Greg Rubin, owner of California's Own Native Landscape Design, started working with native plants back in 1985, while renovating his parent's home in Chatsworth, CA. Although educated and subsequently employed in a successful engineering career, Greg maintained a fascination with natives based on this early experience. Soon, he was landscaping for friends and family on weekends and holidays. Demand continued to rise, and by 1993, Greg was able to start his successful and unusual landscaping business. Since that time, his company has designed over 500 native landscapes in San Diego County.

Greg has been featured in a number of periodicals including the North County Times, Union Tribune, and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Home and Garden, San Diego Reader, and California Gardener. Media coverage includes appearances on KGTV, KUSI, and KFMB. He has also been a repeat guest on KPBS radio’s These Days with Tom Fudge. Greg regularly gives presentations on native plants to garden clubs and other organizations throughout San Diego County.


May 19, 2009 -Real California Natives: Experience the food, drink and medicine
by Kristie Orosco

The indigenous people of San Diego County have been using native plants for many thousands of years. These plants have significant meaning and are still commonly used for food, drink and medicine. This month’s presentation is a special opportunity for all of us to experience what many native people already know. Our meeting will begin with tasting three food items including Shaawii (acorn pudding), miners lettuce and chia seed mix.  We will also enjoy Manzanita berry tea, lemonade berry tea and chia energy drinks. And we will learn about and experience the medicinal use of elderberry, mistletoe wash and oak gall wash. Please note that some foods may be substituted, depending on harvest abundance and seasonal availability; however, every effort will be made to make the above mentioned plants and foods available.
All of us will be able to sample various items and learn a little about how they are prepared and used from the people whose ancestors have been appreciating native plants for a very long time.

Biography

Kristie Orosco is a member of the Kumeyaay Tribe and has lived on the San Pasqual Indian Reservation all of her life.  The Kumeyaay Tribe is the Indigenous Community of San Diego, who’s aboriginal territory spans from Northern Baja California to the San Dieguito/Margarita watersheds.  The San Pasqual Indian Reservation is situated in a coastal sage scrub and oak woodland community; this is where Kristie’s plant knowledge and inspiration was born.  Kristie’s interest in ethno-botany began over 20 years ago and continues today.  This interest in native plants and the environment has flowed over into her career path.  Since 1994 Ms. Orosco has manifested her life’s passion by working in the Tribal Environmental Protection field.   For ten years Kristie has been a Board Member of the Native American Environmental Protection Coalition.  Ms. Orosco has accomplished many projects and most currently is the Environmental Director for a local Tribal Government.   Her current position is gives her the opportunity to manage projects such as:  Development of a Tribal Sustainability Plan, Implementing a River Restoration Project, a Native Plant Trail and Interpretive Center project, management of a 150+ acre Endangered Species Habitat Preserve, Cultural Resources Protection Program,  Extensive Environmental Education Outreach and many others.    It is a goal of Ms. Orosco to advocate for the protection of San Diego’s rich biological diversity; because she is confident that this will compliment the protection of the cultural tradition and heritage of San Diego’s indigenous peoples.


April 21, 2009 - Native Treasures: Plant Encounters in the California Outback
by Nevin Smith

Nevin Smith has spent his entire life growing plants in California and exploring its wild landscape with a passion. Our speaker this month will present a personal account of the joys and challenges of exploring the California landscape, working with its native plant treasures, and bringing them to California gardeners.
Mr. Smith has been one of California’s most respected nurserymen for over 30 years. Currently he is Director of Horticulture at Suncrest Nurseries in Watsonville. He has selected, named and introduced numerous native plants familiar to many of us.
Please join us for this important presentation from one of the most respected horticulturalists in the industry.


March 17, 2009 - Nature as the Enemy: A discussion of proposals to masticate, burn, and graze native plant communities in the name of “fire safety.”
by Rick Halsey

The cost of viewing chaparral as fuel. This remarkable stand of manzanita chaparral in the Cleveland National Forest that was featured on the Fall 2007 cover of the California Native Plant Society’s quarterly journal Fremontia was masticated by the USFS in 2008. The mastication shown above continues around a Coulter pine tree plantation. The area is miles away from any community

Rather than dealing comprehensively with wildfire risk, many local governments are promoting vegetation “clearance” strategies that seriously compromise protected wildlands, challenge the integrity of habitat conservation plans, and increase the spread of invasive species. Some San Diego County officials have expressed the desire to exempt such vegetation “treatments” from the California Environmental Quality Act. Under the federal Healthy Forests Restoration Act, millions of dollars are spent to “treat acres” rather than dealing with fire risk where it would be most effective, immediately around and within human communities. Please join us as we discuss threats posed to California’s native plant communities by misguided fuel treatment projects and what you can do to help protect San Diego County’s native plants from unwise land use policies.


Feb 17, 2009 - San Clemente Island Habitat Recovery
by Jonathan Dunn

San Clemente Island, which is home to several rare and endemic plant and animal species, is also managed by the US Navy as an alternative landing field and training facility. Unmanaged grazing by feral goats during the last century caused extensive damage to the island's unique biota. During the last two decades the Navy has invested considerable effort on San Clemente Island to assist the recovery of endangered species and stabilize the island's damaged ecosystems. Jonathan Dunn, currently a biologist at EDAW, is a former project manager for the San Clemente Island Native Habitat Restoration Program. Jonathan will present a status review of habitat and species recover projects undertaken by the Navy in recent years on the island.

Biography - Jonathan Dunn is a native San Diegan with fifteen years of experience in the field of native plant conservation. Jonathan has planned and the directed the implementation of large scale habitat restoration projects on San Clemente Island, the Mojave desert, and coastal San Diego county and has participated on multidisciplinary endangered species recovery teams.  Jonathan has broad experience in the collection of native seed for habitat restoration and plant conservation and has studied seed conservation practices at the Millennium Seed Bank in Wakehurst, England. Jonathan is currently working as a plant ecologist for EDAW, and he is the former manager of the CRES Botanical Conservation Center and Native Seed Gene Bank.


Jan 20, 2009 - The Right Plant in the Right Place:California Natives for Particular Landscape Situations
by Dan Songster

Many of our natives have wide landscape potential, others a more narrow application and some can be used in unexpected ways! Some of the plants discussed will fit into one of the situations you have in your home garden, or you may see ways to use natives you have not considered before.

For instance, do you have a slope in that you wish covered in durable, drought tolerant plants? Is there a section of your yard that is always dry and you really need a plant that can live with rainwater alone and still be gorgeous? Are you contemplating using a native tree and wonder if you have the room or the right situation? Need a hedge or a screen plant between you and your neighbor? Simply looking for fragrance and color for use in a Mediterranean style bed? No problem! Many examples of our versatile natives will be touched on during Dan’s presentation.

Biography - Dan Songster
Co-Director of the Golden West College Native Garden, Huntington Beach.
Board Member, Orange County Chapter of the California Native Plant Society
Active on the state level of CNPS, currently serving on the CNPS Horticulture Committee.
Employed in landscape design, installation, and maintenance for over 30 years. California native plants emphasized since 1978.
Interests other than gardening with natives include Surfing, hiking, reading (writing), and family!


Nov 18, 2008 - Native plant uses by the Santa Ysabel Kumeyaay
by Ken Hedges
The Kumeyaay People of Southern California have been mastering the use of native plants for thousands of years. Author and ethnobotanist Ken Hedges has studied this history in Santa Isabel and together with Christina Beresford wrote a book in 1986 which highlights some of the most important uses of native plants in Kumeyaay culture.
Please join Ken to hear this fascinating presentation on native plant uses for food, medicine and basketry.

Photo: Christina Beresford grinding Q. kelloggii

Biography

Ken Hedges is Webmaster, Publications Editor, and a former curator of the San Diego Museum of Man. He graduated from Mount Miguel High School, Spring Valley, California, in June 1961, and received his BA (1966) and MA (1970) Degrees from San Diego State University, where his thesis title was An Analysis of Diegueño Pictographs.

 Ken is the author of Santa Ysabel Ethnobotany, based on fieldwork with his collaborator, Christina Beresford, now deceased, who was one of the last Northern Diegueño individuals to have an extensive knowledge of native plant uses. Published in 1986 and continuously in print since that time, the book has become minor classic since few studies of  Kumeyaay/Diegueño ethnobotany have been done. In 1997 Ken published Fibers and Forms, a comprehensive overview of American Indian basketry of the west, from Alaska to the Mexican border. He has authored over 100 published papers, edited volumes, books, and reports on Native American rock art, shamanism, archaeoastronomy, ethnobotany, Southwestern ceramics, American Indian basketry, and other topics.


Oct 21, 2008 - Nursery grown native plants: What are the implications for our local ecology
by Jonathan Dunn and Mike Evans

The introduction of some nursery grown native plant material into the local ecosystem has recently received significant attention from industry experts. Many believe that nursery grown plant materials can actually disrupt and damage the gene pool of local species.

This month the San Diego CNPS will host 2 experts on the subject in a forum moderated by a volunteer CNPS board member.
Mike Evans, co-founder of Tree of Life Nursery and Jonathan Dunn former Manager of the CRES Seed Bank will share their perspectives on the risks and the benefits of nursery grown materials.

Biographies

Jonathan Dunn is a native San Diegan with fifteen years of experience in the field of native plant conservation. Jonathan has planned and the directed the implementation of large scale habitat restoration projects on San Clemente Island, the Mojave Desert, and coastal San Diego County and has participated on multidisciplinary endangered species recovery teams.  Jonathan has broad experience in the collection of native seed for habitat restoration and plant conservation and has studied seed conservation practices at the Millennium Seed Bank in Wakehurst, England. Jonathan is currently working as a plant ecologist for EDAW, and he is the former manager of the CRES Botanical Conservation Center and Native Seed Gene Bank.

Mike Evans was born and raised in southern California.  In 1976, he co-founded Tree of Life Nursery, the largest native plant nursery in California. He has been active in many conservation, horticultural and botanical organizations.  He was past president (2005) of the International Plant Propagators Society, and past president (2001) of the California Society for Ecological Restoration.  He has been active in the California Native Plant Society, the California Botanical Society, and The Nature Conservancy and he served on the horticultural committee for The Jepson Manual project. He is on the board of the Donna O’Neill Land Conservancy in San Juan Capistrano, Casa Romantica Cultural Center in San Clemente, the San Juan Capistrano Historical Society, and the Reserve at Rancho Mission Viejo.


Sept 16, 2008 - California Native Plants for the Garden
by Bart O'Brien

San Diego County is home to more native plant species than any other county in the U.S. Climate, geography, and geology play prominent roles in this remarkable diversity. Water quality and supply issues, wildfires, drought, and a remarkably equable climate that is periodically marred by devastating freezes – these are just a few of the horticultural realities facing gardeners in and around San Diego. Not surprisingly, the native plants are up to these challenges – and most are beautiful and easily grown. The challenge may be obtaining these regionally-adapted gems as they are not as readily grown in the majority of the state of California. Our speaker will focus on some of the well-known and lesser-known species and cultivars of southern-most California and northwestern Baja California, Mexico (the mediterranean-climate area) that are ideal for local gardens.

Biography
Mr. O'Brien is Director of Horticulture at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, Los Angeles County. The 86-acre garden boasts the largest cultivated collection of native Californian plants with 70,000 plants representing 2,000 species, hybrids, and cultivars.

Bart has a Master of Landscape Architecture from Harvard and is the current President of the Southern California Horticultural Society.

He collaborated on The Landscaping Guidelines and Plant Palettes for the Los Angeles River, recently adopted by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. He is also co-author of California Native Plants for the Garden.


July 15, 2008 - Invasive Plant Studies
by Carl Bell

Invasive plant species have invaded our local habitat. This week is Invasive Weed Awareness Week and CNPSSD is pleased to host Carl Bell as he presents the latest research on the biology and ecology of pest species and discusses educational methodologies and natural resource policy issues related to invasive plants. Special emphasis will be made on the unique issues related to habitat recovery after the recent wildfires.

Biography
Carl E. Bell is the Regional Advisor of Invasive Plants from the University of California Comparative Extension. He is responsible for extension research and outreach in six southern California Counties (San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside, Ventura, and San Bernardino). Clientele for this position are land owners/land managers of public and private properties. The focus is on non-native plants that have invaded natural habitats.
He received his Bachelor’s Degree in Biology and his Masters Degree in Botany from California State University, Long Beach.


June 17, 2008 - Cacti and Agaves and Yuccas of California and Nevada
by Stephen Ingram - An accomplished photographer and botanist
Accomplished photographer and botanist Stephen Ingram's multimedia program will cover some of the unique attributes of the cactus and agave families, and highlight what makes these plants such intriguing components of our plant communities.
The program will also showcase some of the species and varieties that occur in California's deserts and coastal areas.
Books and photo note cards of Stephen's will be available to purchase following the presentation.

Biography
Stephen Ingram is a native Californian with a long interest in plants and plant ecology. He
received a B.S. degree in biology from Lewis and Clark College, and an M.A. degree in botany
from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Following graduate school, Stephen was
employed as part of the Research Department at Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota, Florida,
managing the herbarium and working on an epiphyte flora of Monteverde, Costa Rica. He has
also worked as a botanical consultant doing rare plant surveys in the Eastern Sierra and the
Mojave Desert. Stephen is past president of the Bristlecone Chapter of CNPS. His photos have
been used in numerous books, magazines, and calendars and you can see more of his images at
www.ingramphoto.com.


May 20, 2008 - The Flora of San Diego County: What's New?
by Dr. Jon Rebman, Curator of Botany, San Diego Natural History Museum, and Dr. Mary Ann Hawke, Project Director, San Diego County Plant Atlas

Get an update on the discoveries that have been made by the San Diego County Plant Atlas project (www.sdplantatlas.org). Over 500 trained volunteer "parabotanists" have collected 31,000 plant specimens, including many new county records, since 2003. Hear how the Museum's collections are an important source of long-term scientific data documenting the history of the county's biodiversity going back over 150 years - and learn how this valuable information is being put to use locally. Find out more about a new interactive plant key (on CD) now available to help you identify our local plants. It covers all native and naturalized plants (including flowering plants, trees, grass-like plants, ferns and fern allies) known to grow in the county.

Biographies

 

Jon Rebman Ph.D. is Curator of Botany at the San Diego Natural History Museum. His research interests include the systematics of the cactus family, as well as the flora of San Diego and Imperial counties, and Baja California.

Mary Ann Hawke Ph.D. is the Project Director of the San Diego County Plant Atlas
She is a plant ecologist interested in assessing ecological health in arid lands, and studying the effects of climate change on our local flora.


 

April 15 , 2008 - Healthy Backyard Habitat: Encouraging birds and butterflies with a native plant garden
By Mel Hinton and David Kimball

This presentation demonstrates how to make a California garden into a slice of natural landscape that requires minimal maintenance, conserves water and best of all attracts wildlife.
This bird friendly habitat has the right mix of native plants and the three things all birds need: food, water and shelter. By using California native plants there will be fewer insect and disease problems and best of all, birds and butterflies are naturally drawn to these plants. This program is designed to get you started on planning your own native plant garden - one that benefits both people and wildlife.

Biographies

Mel Hinton had a career as an airline pilot flying for TWA. Seeing the impact of development and pollution across the country from 33,000 feet made him a conservationist and after retiring he decided to do something about the problem. He joined the San Diego Audubon Society (SDAS) and became a member of their Board of Directors in 2002 and president in 2005. As an active Audubon volunteer he has been involved in a number of conservation issues including coastal sage scrub restoration and environmental advocacy.

David Kimball is on the Board of SDAS and has been an active gardener for many years. He manages the restoration program at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park and has worked on several other habitat restoration projects. He is Co-chair of the Friends of Famosa Slough in Point Loma and has been instrumental in the restoration effort of this wetland. David is a Stanford graduate and was an Engineering Manager at Lockheed Martin Corporation.

 


March 18, 2008 - Insects: One of Nature's Helpers in Plant Reproduction

by Michael Klein
When we think about insects and their relationship with plants we usually think about butterflies or bees gathering pollen or nectar and enjoy watching them go about their daily routine. But Nature has developed a long standing relationship with plants and the insects which pollinate them. Things like flower color or smell or blooming time all go into who and when pollination takes place. Even the shape of pollen grains is an integral part of the strategies plants use for their ability to reproduce. Mr. Klein will introduce you to some of the basics that go into a very complex world between plants and their pollinators.

 

Biography
Michael Klein is a biologist within the San Diego Region with a love for butterflies and other insects. Over forty years he has spent time on and off learning and experiencing butterflies. Within the past decade he has developed an interest in our natural habitats and has started to look at some of the pollination strategies that make up our unique ecosystems. He is currently studying the pollination of two sensitive plants in San Diego, Lakeside Ceanothus and San Diego Thornmint.



February 19, 2008 - Death Valley - 1998 "Wildflower Year of the Century

by Rosemary Foster

The El Nino rains of 1997-1998 brought a record 5.8 inches of rainfall to DeathValley. The rains were spaced just far enough apart to ensure an extensive growth period and continuous bloom for much of the Death Valley flora. Rosemary Foster, an accomplished horticulturalist and past President Monterey Bay Chapter of CNPS was there and will be sharing her impressions and her photographs with us.

 

Biography
Rosemary Foster studied horticulture and botany at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and is a horticultural consultant in Carmel. Her current projects include compiling and editing a collection of Lester Rowntree’s articles on the horticultural use of California native plants for publication by CNPS. Her bibliography of Lester Rowntree’s periodical publications (720 entries) was recently published by UC Press in the reprint of Rowntree’s Hardy Californians.


 

January 15, 2008 -  "Designing California Native Gardens" Book Signing, Slide Show and Plant Sale
Presentation from Alrie Middlebrook, author and owner of Middlebrook Gardens, San Jose

The recently released book Designing California Native Gardens; the Plant Community Approach to Artful Ecological Gardens

Books will be available for sale and can be signed by the co-author, Alrie Middlebrook.

Many native plant nurseries will also be selling plants at the meeting.

 

Biography


Alrie Middlebrook is a committed advocate and practitioner of the sustainable lifestyle, respected landscape professional and California native plant specialist. Her San Jose, California-based build/design firm, Middlebrook Gardens, has installed over 150 California native gardens and remains on the leading edge of the rising sustainability movement.

She published the California native plant cook book, "Eating California" and co-authored the groundbreaking new book "Designing California Native Gardens; The Plant Community Approach to Artful, Ecological Gardens," with renowned field botanist, Dr. Glenn Keator. She produced the first full color glossy magazine focusing on sustainable construction and native gardening, "Green Heart," named after her regional newspaper column.

Middlebrook's native gardens are based on ecologically appropriate plant species and cutting edge sustainable technology and techniques. Advantages to a native garden include reduced costs, greater efficiency and ecological wellness. Her marketing and garden installation program, Lose The Lawn, offers low cost, simple solutions to "lose your lawn" and upgrade to a pesticide free, water saving, low maintenance native landscape. For more information please visit www.losethelawn.com.

Alrie Middlebrook is committed to educating the public and promoting sustainability through native gardening. Her many workshops and speaking engagements at diverse venues throughout the State of California have provided key forums promoting critical knowledge and understanding. Her support of community efforts to embrace sustainability has spawned recent projects like Granada Native Gardens, Guadalupe River Park and Gardens, River Street Historical Gardens and her co-founding of The California Native Garden Foundation.
For more information please visit www.cngf.org.
For more information on Alrie Middlebrook and Middlebrook Gardens, please visit www.middlebrook-gardens.com , www.losethelawn.com .

 


November 27 , 2007 -  "A Tour of San Diego County's Tallest Trees" Slide Show
by James Lightner author of San Diego County Native Plants
A book so popular, it's now in its second edition!

Books will be available for sale and book signing before and after the meeting.
A full-color photo guide to the county's plants, this book makes a great holiday present!

Fred Roberts will also be at the November meeting selling his original artwork of native plants which includes both pictures for the wall and holiday cards- another great gift idea and some of the proceeds benefit the native plants!!


 


October 16, 2007 - "Restoration of Coastal Sage Scrub in San Juan Capistrano"

by Marty McPhee of Park West Companies

 

Marty McPhee will describe the process of re-establishing a coastal sage scrub community on 75 acres of ridgeline on Reed Ranch that had been overgrazed by cattle for over 50 years. Elimination of the resulting infestation of invasive non-native weeds, primarily cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) and mustard (Brassica species), and the seed banks of these weeds, was an extreme challenge that was overcome in this project. Means & methods, trials & tribulations will be discussed!

 


 

September 18, 2007 - "Native Plant Fair"

by Greg Rubin, California’s Own Native Landscape Design


Native Plant Fair featuring a brand new presentation on Landscaping with California’s Native Plants by Greg Rubin.

Recon Native Plants, Native Plant Connection, Tree of Life Nursery, Las Pilitas, Moosa Creek and Cal-Native Plants Nurseries will have information tables set up.These expert nurseries specialize in sustainable home gardens and/or habitat restoration.

Biography:

Greg Rubin,owner of California's Own Native Landscape Design, started working with native plants back in 1985, while renovating his parent's home in Chatsworth, CA. Although educated and subsequently employed in a successful engineering career, Greg maintained a fascination with natives based on this early experience. Soon, he was landscaping for friends and family on weekends and holidays. Demand continued to rise, and by 1993, Greg was able to start his successful and unusual landscaping business. Since that time, his company has designed over 400 native landscapes in San Diego County.
Greg has been featured in a number of periodicals including the North County Times, Union Tribune, and magazines such as Sunset, San Diego Home and Garden, San Diego Reader, and California Gardener. Media coverage includes appearances on KGTV, KUSI, and KFMB. He has also been a repeat guest on KPBS radio's These Days with Tom Fudge. Greg regularly gives presentations on native plants to garden clubs and other organizations throughout San Diego County.
Noteworthy projects:
. Design and installation of the Los Angeles City Fire Department Training Center native fire-resistant landscape.
. Department of Homeland Security FEMA grant for design and installation of the Elfin Forest Fire Department firewise landscape.
. Design and installation of UCC Church native garden in La Mesa, CA.
. Wildflower meadow & shade garden at Live Oak Park in Fallbrook, CA, later featured in Sunset Magazine.
. Design and installation of the native landscape at the Rincon del Diablo Municipal Water District in Escondido, CA.
. The Lerner project, featured on KUSI's Garden Club series.
. Collaboration with Drew and James Hubbell on Shelter Island project.
. Design and specifications for Indian Health Services Santa Ysabel Medical Center landscape.
. Design collaboration and consultation for the Navy Medical Center's Healing Garden.
. Design of 2 acre native landscape at Indian Rock Park in Vista, CA.
. Rennovation of the large wolf enclosure for the California Wolf Center in Julian.
. Re-design of upper Point Loma Native Plant Preserve at Collier park.
. Design collaboration and maintenance for the Buena Vista Audubon Center in Oceanside.
. Shaw-Lopez residential green space in Sorrento Valley.
Workshop/Seminar List:
. University of California Cooperative Extension Master Gardener Program
Publication List:
. Spring 1998, Wild Garden Magazine "Creating a Successful Native Landscape".
April 2002, California Gardener Magazine "Why Should Natives Seem so Exotic?"


June 19, 2007 - "Mission Valley Preserve Pollinator Garden",

by Kym Hunter, San Diego River Park Foundation

Learn how the San Diego River Park Foundation, working with community groups, students, agencies, and private partners, is improving a wetland in the Mission Valley Preserve. Formerly dominated by weedy annual non-native plants, the group has brought back the native plants, with a focus on attracting pollinators, to create a pleasant community place in an area of the City that is currently lacking in park lands. Kym will also discuss progress made in organizing volunteer groups to care for the Point Loma Native Plant Garden.

 


May 15, 2007 - "Innovative Irrigation Systems for Native Plant Restoration",

by David Bainbridge, Marshall Goldsmith School of Management. Alliant International University

Author of the recently released “A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration”, David Bainbridge will discuss the ecology of desert plants, and proven techniques for restoring degraded arid regions.
 

Biography:
  ▪ David A. Bainbridge is active as a researcher, author and consultant in sustainable management.
  ▪ His work has taken him to China, Mexico, Belize, Portugal, Jordan and England. His articles have appeared in a wide range of journals – from Restoration Ecology to Agricultural Water Management to Resource Engineering and Technology for a Sustainable World, and Solar Today. He has written 11 books and 12 book chapters and more than 250 articles and reports.

  ▪ He is also active as a reviewer for proposals and programs (NSF, USDA, universities) and journals (Environmental Management, Natural Hazards, Restoration Ecology, Restoration and Management Notes, and many others).
  ▪ Past advisor: California Energy Commission, California Department of Transportation, National Affordable Housing Coalition.
 


April 17, 2007 - "The San Diego River Restoration Project in Lakeside: An Integrated Approach to Restoration",

by Robin Rierdan, Executive Director Lakeside’s River Park Conservancy
 

Lakeside's River Park Conservancy has embarked on an ambitious 100 acre restoration project along the San Diego River. Robin will describe the plan and progress towards creating and restoring a variety of habitats, including emergent wetlands, riparian, coastal sage, and a mix of grasslands.  Flood control and water quality are also integral to the project. 
 


March 20, 2007 - "Computer Aided Wildflower Species Identification",

by Ken Bowles
 

While assembling a portfolio of close-up digital photographs of San Diego's immensely diverse wildflowers, Ken Bowles found himself spending more time identifying the species in his photos than in all other activities combined. Therefore, Ken has used the Lucid3 software application to build a Multiple-Entry key for wildflowers of San Diego County, focusing first on the sunflower family (Asteraceae) and more recently on San Diego’s other wildflower families. The key supplements the use of the standard dichotomous key in the Jepson Manual. The presentation will show how to identify several obscure species using photographs. The Multiple-Entry keys are available for public use on Ken's website. Ken’s photos are also featured on the Plant Atlas home page.

 

The title refers back to "CAI" (Computer Aided Instruction) which used to be a big topic in universities and their computer centers. Ken was professor of computer science at UCSD from 1965 until 1984, and directed the main campus computer center during part of that. He started using computers for environmental monitoring (initially, radar probing of the ionized upper atmosphere) in 1950.

Ken Bowles grew up in a wildflower oriented family, then spent his career working with computers - first for atmospheric studies using radar, then teaching software engineering at UCSD. On retirement, he turned to close-up digital photographs of San Diego's immensely diverse wildflowers, and quickly found himself spending more time identifying species than in all other activities combined. Hoping to help others with similar ID problems, he built a website photo-based identification key modeled on a CD-Rom published by CNPS East-Bay chapter people. But the photos-only approach proved un-helpful for working with the larger botanic families, and the top-level dichotomous keys of the Jepson Manual not useful at all.

Eventually, to make progress with his Asteraceae (Sunflower) family photos, Ken turned to the "Lucid3" tool of Univ. Queensland, and built a Multiple-Entry (spreadsheet-like) key for the Asteraceae known to grow in San Diego County (per the SDNHM "Checklist"). The success of this approach was so dramatic that he has now turned to building a similar M-E key for most of our other wildflower families. This presentation will illustrate progress to date by showing identification of several obscure species from photographs. Both of these M-E keys are available for public use on Ken's website.

 


February 20, 2007 - "Guns & Roses – Adventures in Desert Restoration at the
U.S. Army National Training Center, Fort Irwin",

Michelle Cloud-Hughes
 

The Soil Ecology & Restoration Group at San Diego State University specializes in native plant revegetation and erosion control on government lands throughout southern California. For the past 15 years, SERG has been doing desert restoration and research in the central Mojave Desert at the U.S. Army's National Training Center, Fort Irwin. This presentation will focus on SERG's trials, tribulations, and successes with restoration in this harsh environment. Many photos of spectacular desert wildflowers will also be featured.

 

Michelle Cloud-Hughes is a project manager and botanist for the Soil Ecology & Restoration Group at San Diego State University. She began working for SERG as an undergraduate in 1997 and immediately fell in love with the adventures and satisfactions of restoration work in remote desert environments. Michelle has been a desert rat since her first visit to Joshua Tree National Park shortly after moving to southern California in 1991. She has been photographing plants for 4 years and has submitted over 600 photos to the CalPhotos online image library.

 


January 16, 2007 - "Native Medicinal Herbs",

James David Adams, Jr. Ph.D. and Cecilia Garcia
 

Cecilia Garcia, a Chumash healer and James Adams, a professor of Pharmacology at the University of Southern California will discuss healing with native plants. They are co-authors of “Healing with Medicinal Plants of the West - Cultural and Scientific Basis for Their Use".

 


November 28, 2006 - "Torrey Pines State Reserve: San Diego’s Treasure",

Margaret L. Fillius, Docent, Torrey Pines State Reserve
 

Margaret Fillius is a docent at the Torrey Pines State Reserve, which inspired her to become an enthusiastic amateur botanist. Her presentation will photographically introduce you to Torrey Pines State Reserve through the eyes of a volunteer and show you many of her favorite plants of the different habitats there.

Margaret is the author of a color field guide “Native Plants: Torrey Pines State Reserve and Nearby San Diego County Locations.” The book will be available for sale at the presentation, and you can have your copy signed by the author.
 


October 17, 2006 - "Chaparral: California's Botanical Treasure",

Rick Halsey, California Chaparral Field Institute
 

It gets a bad rap, but that’s because it’s misunderstood. Of all the distinct, natural communities in California, only one is found throughout and only one can be said to represent the state’s most characteristic wilderness: the chaparral. Join us as we explore the chaparral’s unique natural history, reveal the truth concerning its many myths and surprising mysteries, and why it represents such a vital link to nature for all Californians. We will also have a short discussion relating to how to best protect your home from wildfire, currently a very hot topic in San Diego County.

Richard W. Halsey is a chaparral ecologist, writer, and director of The California Chaparral Field Institute and author of “Fire, Chaparral, and Survival in Southern California”, which will be available for purchase at the presentation.

September 19, 2006 - "Lashbrook Park Case Study: Landscaping with Natives"

by Bob Perry, Perry & Associates
 

Lashbrook Park is a newly created native plant park within the City of El Monte.  It is built on a two-acre parcel of land adjacent to the Rio Hondo Channel and is key part of the 'Emerald Necklace' master plan for the San Gabriel Valley that contains bike trails, greenbelts and community parks.  The design and planting of Lashbrook Park follows the Los Angeles River Master Plan Landscaping Guidelines. Bob Perry was the principal designer of the native plant associations and irrigation systems. Bob will present his concepts and summarize the challenges presented by urban debris, poor site drainage, contaminated soil, non-native plants, and invasive plants.

 


July 18, 2006 - "The War on Weeds: Protecting California’s Biodiversity"

By Don Mayall, Coordinator, CNPS Invasive Exotics Working Group

The invasive non-native working group of CNPS is a component of the conservation program. Our goal is preservation of biodiversity in California from threats posed to ecosystems by invasive pest plants. Invasive plants are also a major threat to the state's agriculture, watersheds, flood control, recreational areas, open space, and fire protection. This means we have potent allies in protecting our biodiversity. The presentation reviews the legal basis and institutional players in the war against weeds and provides some examples of what CNPS chapters are doing to make a difference.

Don is coordinator for the state CNPS Invasive Non-native Working Group and represents the state organization with groups concerned with control of invasive pest plants. He is past president of the Santa Clara Valley Chapter of CNPS and current Rare Plant Coordinator for the southern part of the chapter's area. He has also represented the chapter on the steering committees of the Weed Management Areas of San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Since retirement from Ohlone College in Fremont, his major concern has been the protection of rare serpentine endemics in area south of San Jose.

With his wife, Carolyn, also a chapter past president and environmental activist, he is an enthusiastic native plant gardener, traveler, cat custodian, lover of early music, and grandparent. We want see our heritage preserved for the generations of human, animal, and plant populations to come.


June 20, 2006 - "The Ecology of Fungi: The Little Things Plants Can’t Live Without"

By by Lawrence Glacy

 

Fungi are essential to the success of land plants and ecosystem processes. We will examine the how the evolution of fungi resulted in a fungi-plant symbiosis. These interactions occurring at the cellular, microscopic, and chemical level in plant roots helped to maximize the success of plants on land. As such, it is the “little things" that have had the greatest influence on the evolution of plant life, flowering plants being a very recent expression of this process. Although “survival of the fittest” has been the dominant paradigm to explain evolutionary events, emphasizing competition and expressed in warlike metaphors, the processes involved at this microscopic level have been far more cooperative than competitive, more interrelated than individual, and more symbiotic and mutual than traditional Darwinism suggests. 

 

Lawrence Glacy accompanied the San Diego Natural History Museum on its 2004 Bi-national expedition as the expert lichenologist/mycologist. He is the author of China's Conservation Scheme, Protecting Species or Generating Profits, published by the Woodrow Wilson Center China Environment Series. He delivered the Colloquium Presentation for the Biology Department, Sonoma State University entitled Fungi Ecology and the Biology/ Management Interface. He has a Juris Doctor Degree from Southwestern University, a B.A. in Environmental Science from Sonoma State University and an M.A. in Mycology and Management from Sonoma State University. He has contributed articles on fungi and algae and was the Assistant Curator of the Lichen, Algae, Fungi Herbarium, Sonoma State University.


 May 16, 2006 - "Mapping Species Distributions: Spatial Inference and Prediction"

By Janet Franklin, Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego

 

Maps of actual or potential species distributions are required for many aspects of resource management and conservation planning including biodiversity assessment, habitat management and restoration, single- and multiple- species and habitat conservation plans, population viability analysis, modeling community and ecosystem dynamics, and predicting the effects of climate change on species and ecosystems. A growing number of quantitative methods are being used inferentially (to identify the parameters that determine habitat suitability) and predictively (to assign habitat value to locations where biological survey data are lacking - which includes most of the earth's surface). Dr. Franklin will discuss an ecological framework to guide the use of these methods for biodiversity assessment and landscape management.

Dr. Franklin is a Professor of Biology and Adjunct Professor of Geography at San Diego State University. She received a Bachelors degree in Biology, and a Masters and Ph.D. degree in Geography, all from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests include landscape ecology, plant ecology, remote sensing, and geographic information science. She has conducted research on plant community dynamics at large spatial scales in the Mediterranean-climate chaparral and conifer forest ecosystems of California, and in arid regions of North America and West Africa, as well as the tropical forests of Oceania. She teaches general, plant, landscape, and fire ecology. She has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles and has received research support from NASA, NSF, USGS, Forest Service, California State Parks, and National Geographic Society.


April 18, 2006 - "Building Roads While Saving Species: CalTrans Mitigation Program"

By Bruce April, Chief of the Environmental Stewardship Branch, CALDOT, District 11

 

Bruce April will present an overview of CaltransÕ biological mitigation efforts in San Diego and Imperial counties. Over the past twenty-five years, Caltrans has established over fifty sites totaling more than five thousand acres, which include a multitude of habitats and species. He will discuss the unique challenges at some of the sites and successes and failures of others. Bruce will conclude his presentation with what is in the future for CaltransÕ biological mitigation program, including a description of the Environmental Mitigation Program that is funded through the new TransNet sales tax extension.

 


March 21, 2006 - "Native Grasses for Landscaping, Restoration, and Water Quality"

By John DiGregoria, Range Manager, Point Reyes National Seashore, National Park Service

 

John will begin by presenting the ecophysiology of grasses, followed by how to effectively use native grasses in landscaping, restoration, and water quality management. The presentation will discuss how grasses and other graminoids function in plant communities and how to use them to reduce water use at home and in the natural environment.

John is an Ecologist with the National Park Service; he has an extensive background as a restoration ecologist working with a variety of plant communities from the northwest to the southwest. As a board member of the California Native Grass Association, John has instructed CNGA workshops and conferences. John is currently the president-elect for CNGA and will be co-teaching the Grass Identification workshop at Santa Rosa Plateau in April, 2006. John has a B.S in Terrestrial Ecology from Huxley College of Environmental Studies in Bellingham, Washington and a Masters of Environmental Science from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington.

 


February 21, 2006 - "Introduction to Bioengineering"

By Dick Rol, Planning and Design Division Manager, of Foothill Associates, San Diego

Dick Rol will present an introduction to the use of living plant material for structural purposes such as stream bank stabilization, a technique known as bioengineering. The presentation will explain the basic concepts of bioengineering, how it works, and the steps necessary to plan, design, and implement a project. It will include examples of past projects completed by Mr. Rol, and by others.

Mr. Rol is a Landscape Architect with Foothill Associates, a San Diego environmental planning and design firm. Prior to joining Foothill Associates, he co-authored a planning handbook for the Natural Resources Conservation Service titled Conservation Corridor Planning at the Landscape Level; Managing for Wildlife Habitat; designed and implemented large-scale mine reclamation projects throughout Utah; and helped lead environmentally-responsible projects for the City of San Diego's Engineering and Capital Projects Department as a Senior Planner. Mr. Rol has a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from Utah State University, and Bachelors Degrees in Landscape Design and Biology from South Dakota State University.


January 17, 2006 - "Gardening with California Native Plants"

By Carol Bornstein, Director of Living Collections and Nursery, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

 

Lecture, new book release, and book signing by the author

The popularity of native plants in gardens and landscapes continues to grow and yet they seem to be used primarily in conventional, familiar ways. In this presentation, Carol Bornstein will explore alternative ideas for designing with native plants and how to successfully cultivate them. She will highlight a few of the many possibilities and tips that are included in her new book, California Native Plants for the Garden, which she co-authored with Bart O'Brien and Dave Fross for Cachuma Press. Copies will be available for purchase (check or cash) and signing by the author at the meeting.

Carol Bornstein is the Director of Living Collections and Nursery at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, which is devoted to the study, display, and conservation of California's native flora. In her work with native plants, she has experimented with innovative design applications, introduced new cultivars, and advocated for regionally appropriate landscaping through her writing and teaching.


November 15, 2005 - "Plant Diversity in San Diego County"

By Tom Oberbauer, San Diego County Planner.

 

San Diego County is one of the most biologically diverse counties in the United States.  The vegetation that exists here now is the result of mass migrations of vegetation affected by climatic change through and since the Pleistocene and a mix of species that are adapted to specific environmental conditions that occur here.  This County supports areas with unique climates and soils such as Torrey Pines State Park as well as areas with soils such as those derived from gabbro and metavolcanic rock that have powerful influence on plants.  Other locations exist as climatic islands in the mountains.  All of these factors make San Diego County one of the most exciting locations in the United States for studying plants and vegetation. Thomas Oberbauer, a planner with the County of San Diego and long time CNPS member and past president will present a discussion of this fascinating area.

 


October 18, 2005 - "‘Belly’ plants of the California Deserts"

By Ileene Anderson, Southern California Regional Botanist for the California Native Plant Society.

 

‘Belly’ plants of the California Deserts, Ileene will show slides of many ‘belly’ plants of our desert areas. ‘Belly’ plants are those beautiful plants you can’t see from the car - you have to get down on your belly to see them! These diminutive beauties are marvels of the typically harsh dry desert regions.

Ileene has a Master's degree in biology from California State University, Northridge and has worked for the state organization of CNPS for 8 years doing conservation work to preserve our incredibly diverse flora in southern California.

This meeting will be held in Room 104 of the Casa Del Prado.


September 20, 2005 - "California Native Plants for the Garden"

By Bart O’Brien, Director of Horticulture, Rancho Santa Anna Botanical Garden, Claremont, CA

Bart O'Brien will talk on California Native Plants for the Garden, a topic he is very passionate about.  He's intimately familiar with growing California natives in a garden setting, and an entertaining speaker.  In this presentation, he will be sharing some of the most suitable native plants species and cultivars for Southern California home gardens and landscapes.  This talk and his beautiful slides will inspire you to plant more natives this fall.  He is also co-authoring the book California Native Plants for the Garden (with Carol Bornstein of Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and Dave Fross of Native Sons Nursery) for Cachuma Press.

Mr. O'Brien is Director of Horticulture at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, where he has worked since 1990.  This 86-acre all-native garden in Claremont, California, is home to 70,000 native Californian plants, representing 2,000 native species, hybrids and cultivars.  This is the largest cultivated collection of native Californian plants.  One of the Garden’s newest displays is a 2 acre collection of the cultivars of Californian plants.  He's also the president of the Southern California Horticultural Society and has long been active in the California Native Plant Society.  Bart has a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from Harvard, and has introduced many native plant cultivars to the trade.  One of his most recently completed projects is the Landscaping Guidelines and Plant Palettes for the Los Angeles River, a collaborative work that has recently been adopted by the Board of Supervisors of Los Angeles County.  A number of readers will be familiar with his numerous writings.  

This meeting will be held in Room 104 of the Casa Del Prado.


July 19, 2005 - "Weed Management In San Diego"

Bill Winans, Coordinator of the San Diego County Weed Management Area

 

In honor of Invasive Weed Awareness Week (July 18th-22nd), Bill will present an overview of the County’s weed management programs and projects.   The San Diego Weed Management Area (SDWMA) was formed to specifically to address a 350 acre infestation of Perennial Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) in the San Dieguito River Park (SDRP). The SDWMA partnered with SDRP to apply for a grant through the State of California Department of Parks and Recreation, Riparian and Riverine Habitat Grant Program. The grant proposal was accepted and the project was funded with $372,000 over six years.  

 


June 21, 2005 - "San Diego County Plant Atlas Project"

By Dr. Jon Rebman

The San Diego County Plant Atlas project has been created by the San Diego Natural History Museum to scientifically document the remarkable floristic diversity of San Diego by initiating the collection of voucher plant specimens throughout the county. Almost 300 parabotanists have participated in a novel program that trains them how to collect specimens and submit field data online. 

The county is a rich source of ongoing novelties and floristic surprises, and with this concentrated effort over 70 new county records have already been documented, and over 10,000 specimen records have been entered into the new database. The Plant Atlas is designed to compliment the County-wide Bird Atlas and Mammal Atlas projects and will provide more accurate and detailed geographic information on the flora of San Diego County for science, education, the interested public, and land managers.l

This meeting will be held in Room 104 of the Casa Del Prado.


May 17, 2005 - "Think and Plant Habitat"

by Mike Evans,  Tree of Life Nursery 

Native plants form the basis for wildlife habitat. Urban sprawl is impacting natural habitat at an alarming rate in southern California, affecting native species and quality of life for humans. As a society, we will do well to find wilderness, even in urban or suburban settings. In very small spaces, we can make a connection between our busy modern lives and the serene beauty of nature by keeping mini-ecosystems in our gardens and patios, even in pots. We will be rewarded by frequent encounters with native pollinators, birds, and other species. As we enjoy tending our potted plants or garden beds, we recall special times spent in our favorite wild areas, and look forward to future visits. The native patio garden brings nature up close on an everyday basis.

This meeting will be held in Room 104 of the Casa Del Prado.


April 19, 2005 - "The use of population models for conservation management of an endangered Australian plant, Grevillea caleyi"

by Helen Regan, Assistant Professor of Biology, SDSU

 

 Grevillea caleyi is an endangered plant species with a restricted range lying partly within Ku-ring-gai Chase and Garigal National Parks in NSW, Australia . The principle threatening processes affecting G. caleyi are habitat destruction and adverse fire regimes combined with high levels of seed predation. A stochastic, spatially explicit, individual-based model was constructed to investigate the population dynamics of small populations of the species and to determine the impact of a variety of management strategies. Results of model simulations indicate there is a high risk of population decline and local extinction in remnant sites with small populations under current management regimes. The most effective fire management strategy is to schedule fires that burn 20 to 100% of sub-populations every 5 to 15 years, in combination with reduced predation rates. When predation management strategies are employed in conjunction with a structured fire regime, then a 20-30% reduction in predation rates can improve the chance of long-term persistence substantially.

 

Due to the focus on a fire dominated ecosystem at the urban-wildland interface, the conservation implications for many Australian plants mirror those for plants in San Diego . The relevance of this research to conservation of endangered and threatened plants in San Diego will be discussed.


March 15, 2005 - "Water Conservation and Native Plants"

by Vickie Driver, Principal Water Resources Specialist, San Diego County Water Authority

Vickie Driver will be speaking about the water supply situation for the coming year, and the role of native plants in water conservation and urban run-off reduction.  She will also introduce some new landscape water conservation programs that are launching now.  Ms. Driver, a long-time CNPS member, promotes the use of natives in all types of landscapes, not just specialized native plant gardens.


February 15, 2005 - "Manzanitas of San Diego"

by James Lightner

Manzanitas are among the most common native shrubs of San Diego County, popular for their twisting branches, beautiful red bark, urn-shaped flowers and apple-like berries. James Lightner will show slides of local manzanitas in their natural settings and point out some of the features of the different species (including a few that are not in his book). He will also say a few words about the book, San Diego County Native Plants and will be available to sign copies before and after his talk. James is a native of San Diego. His educational background includes a degree in Human Biology from Stanford, and he has worked in various advanced-technology industries. He manages ranchland near Descanso.


January 18, 2005 - "Who Speaks for the Shrubland? Fire, Politics, Money, and Emotions are Threatening San Diego's Forests with Extinction"

by Kurt Schasker, retired brush management contractor

Kurt Schasker is a retired brush management contractor scheduled to discuss his experiences working in the wildland-urban interface. He has contracted both for public and private property owners creating firebreaks around structures and has worked directly with inspectors, firefighters, property owners, property managers, and property owner associations.

After 10+ years managing brush, Kurt will argue that our current pre-fire defense procedures are dysfunctional and in critical need of overhaul. He will offer the opinion that homeowner insurance carriers ought to police the brush management process. Government would then be responsible for regulating insurance company power, protecting individual property owner's rights, and defending the environment.

His experience in the Los Angeles area is that as good as firefighting agencies are at fighting fire, they are equally weak in the area of brush management enforcement. As a result, laws are enforced sporadically, if at all. In addition, brush management laws are largely created through the fire fighting agencies, and these laws are frequently not grounded in good science.

As a result of firefighting agency oversight of the brush management system, our native chaparral habitats are falling to the chainsaw in the name of fire safety. This need not be. Our local habitats ought to be protected by the government, not destroyed as a result of their regulations. Kurt feels that we, as a society, put too much blame on wildlalnds the source of the fire problem, and not enough blame on the character and nature of the urban environment. More focus and attention should be given to preparing the urban environment to withstand firestorms, and less attention on ways to alter the native landscape.

Kurt will describe flaws in the brush management system, both in practice and in law, offer examples of his experience with these flaws, and finally, offer solutions.


December 2004 - No Chapter Meeting

 


November 16, 2004 - "Rare Plants of Western San Diego County"

by Fred Roberts

San Diego County supports one of the largest diversities of rare plants in the United States.  Climate, topography, diversity of habitat over small areas, and proximity to Mexico all are contributing factors.  Among the most important habitats are vernal pools and maritime chaparral.  Many of our rare plants are familar, such as San Diego thornmint (Acanthomintha illicifolia) and Otay tarplant (Deinandra conjugens), species listed by the Federal or State government as endangered, while others are best described as obscure.  Fred Roberts, the San Diego Chapter Rare Plant coordinator, will introduce us to some of the over 110 rare species and their habitats.


October 19, 2004 - "Medicinal Uses of San Diego Native Plants"

by Carole A. Brown

Carole A. Brown will discuss how to process and use some native plants as medicine, and will bring dried herbs and tinctures of native medicinal plants for the audience to taste, touch, and smell.  Carole is a clinical herbalist, herb grower, teacher, and owner of a home-based nursery, Browns Herbs, Etc., specializing in medicinal herbs and native plants. Carole has been studying herbs for over 30 years, including taking classes with Amanda McQuade Crawford, MNIMH, John Finch, and a number of other herbalists, and working in a student clinic for two years.  She has been teaching Herbology through Community Learning at Cuyamaca College since 1991.


September 21, 2004 - "Landscaping with Native Plants"

by Bruce Hanson, RECON Environmental, Inc.

 

This last meeting before October’s exciting plant sale will focus on landscaping with native plants.  Bruce will provide the audience with valuable information on use of natives in the created landscape and at the interface of yard and natural habitat.  Arrive on time for a good seat!

 


August  2004 - No Chapter Meeting

 


July 20, 2004 - "Santa Margarita and San Luis Rey Watersheds Weed Management Area"  (SMSLRWMA)

by Jason Giessow, Dendra Inc.

The Santa Margarita and San Luis Rey Watersheds Weed Management Area is a program of the Mission Resource Conservation District that was formed in March 2000 to aid in the large-scale control of invasive non-native plants within the two watersheds.  A Weed Management Area (WMA) is a local organization that brings together land managers and land owners of private, city, county, State and Federal property, and other organizations in an effort to coordinate invasive non-native plant control.  Given the pressures on the natural habitat in most of southern California and the high population levels in many areas, WMAs are a valuable tool in effectively combating non-native plants.  Jason will discuss the goals, methods, funding, and progress of the Santa Margarita and San Luis Rey Watersheds WMA.  Homework for this meeting is to visit the SMSLRWMA website.


June 15, 2004 - "The Cacti of San Diego County"

by Jon P. Rebman, Ph.D., Curator of Botany, San Diego Natural History Museum

San Diego County has 30 different taxa in the family Cactaceae. Of these, 23 are native species, 3 species have escaped from cultivation and naturalized, and 3 opuntioid species are of putative hybrid origin. There are 7 cactus genera listed for the county but most of the diversity is in the genera Cylindropuntia and Opuntia.  Cacti occur natively throughout San Diego County with the greatest diversity (18 taxa) found in the desert areas, but both coastal (10 taxa) and mountain (5 taxa) habitats have native taxa as well.  The Cactaceae of our area are a fascinating group of plants in respect to natural history exhibiting such characteristics as extrafloral nectaries (Ferocactus and Cylindropuntia), gynodioecy (Mammillaria and Cylindropuntia), asexual propagation (Opuntia and Cylindropuntia), and natural hybridization (Opuntia and Cylindropuntia).

 


May 18, 2004 -- Big Plans, Tiny Plants: Do Multi-Species Plans Provide Promised Native Plant Protection?
David Hogan, Urban Wildlands Coordinator for the Center for Biological Diversity

David Hogan will present a conservation perspective on the San Diego Multiple Species Conservation Plan and other similar multi-species plans in the County. David's presentation will include a short history of the plans, discussion of the plans' treatment of plants, and recommendations for improvement.


April 20, 2004 -- An Approach to Help Prioritize Weed Management
Meghan Trainor Fitch, Field Scientist, San Elijo Lagoon Conservancy

Invasive plants may vary in invasion potential across different environments which can make management prioritization difficult. Meghan will describe the purpose of her Master thesis research, which was to quantify the invasiveness or potential for invasiveness of a new weed across environments where it has become established. She will describe how she used a method, traditionally used in conservation biology, to quantify invasiveness of a new weed across environments where it has become established. Meghan studied the population dynamics and recruitment of tansy ragwort in Montana as part of her Master thesis research. She will also define and distinguish between the various terms used to describe nonnative plant species.


March 16, 2004 -- Vernal Pools

by Rick Halsey

The coastal mesas of San Diego County were once dotted with thousands of vernal pools. Fewer than 8 percent remain today. Surviving within these remnants is a unique variety of plants and animals found nowhere else on earth. We will discuss these specialized organisms, the pool's community structure, and what makes these tiny habitats one of our most priceless natural treasures.

Richard Halsey is a field biologist specializing in chaparral ecology and is currently writing a book on southern California's chaparral community. He has been involved in wilderness education for more than thirty years and was San Diego City School's Teacher of the year in 1991.


February 17, 2004 --Natural Resource Management in Colorado Desert District State Parks
Jim Dice, Senior Resource Ecologist, California State Parks

Jim Dice will present an overview of recent and on-going natural resource management efforts in all of the current Colorado Desert District state parks: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, Palomar Mountain State Park, Salton Sea State Recreation Area, Picacho State Recreation Area and the Indio Hills Palms unit. His overview will also include discussion of plans for a new state park in the Campo area, the proposed Camp Lockett State Historic Park. Topics will include rare and endangered plant management, exotic plant control, and prescribed fire management.


January 20, 2004 -- Santa Ysabel Open Space Preserve
Virginia Moran, Biologist

You have probably never heard of the Edwards Family of Julian, but the legacy they have left will live on forever (hopefully) - the new County of San Diego Santa Ysabel Open Space Preserve. As of December 2001, the county acquired the nearly 6000 acre property and since then has been conducting studies of different types on the preserve including herpetological, wildlife, birds, and vegetation/rare plants in order to complete a comprehensive management plan prior to opening the area to the public (and this is the kind of planning that deserves hardy recognition). The County is trying to head problems off at the pass (no pun intended) BEFORE they happen. Virginia Moran was contracted by The Nature Conservancy to complete the vegetation and rare plant surveys. This talk summarizes her results and introduces you to the magic of the Santa Ysabel Preserve.


December 16, 2003 -- The San Diego Fires - A CNPS Panel
7:00 pm, Room 101 (please note different location)

CNPS will host a panel of local experts to discuss the recent San Diego fires and address specific questions and concerns. The meeting will open with a presentation by Lisa Wood of the City of San Diego Environmental Services. Ms. Wood will discuss environmentally sensitive brush control around residences. Following her presentation, each of the following panel members will speak on their topic of specialty. Kirsten Winter, a biologist with the Cleveland National Forest, will address native plant and wildlife responses to fire. Tom Huffman, Senior Vice President at Helix Environmental Planning and former City of San Diego biologist, will discuss lessons learned from the devastating 1986 Normal Heights fire. Bob Eisele of County Watershed Fire Management and Pest Management will talk about the role of controlled burns in fire management. Mike Evans, co-founder of the Tree of Life native plant nursery, will discuss fire-safe principles in the design of homes and landscapes. Greg Rubin, owner/operator of California's Own Landscape Design, will address landscaping for fire safety with native plants and post-fire erosion control.


November 18, 2003--Comparative Floristic Study of Palomar Mountain State Park
Robert K. Lauri, Herbarium Assistant Curator, San Diego State University
Tuesday. 7:30 p.m.
Room 104, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park

This presentation will include plant communities and vascular plant diversity of Palomar Mountain State Park and contiguous lands within the surrounding Cleveland National Forest. The study area is approximately 5,000 acres, and has had little floristic work conducted. The majority of the previously collected plant records were obtained before 1969. This lack of current data highlights the need for current and ongoing floristic research within San Diego County at this time because of detrimental impacts due to increased human population size, urbanization, and invasions of exotic and weedy species. Robert will focus on final data from his ongoing Master's thesis from San Diego State University. Topics of interest will include new plant species records for San Diego County and the study area, rare and endemic plant species diversity and distribution, and weedy and non-native plant diversity.


October 21, 2003--Habitat Restoration
Bruce Hanson, RECON
Tuesday, Meeting 7 pm, Program 7:30 pm Room 104, Casa del Prado, Balboa Park

Biologist Bruce Hanson supervises the field operations for RECON's habitat restoration group. Did you miss the Chapter plant sale or arrived too late to purchase that particular native? Bruce will show some slides of the propagation operation and give a hands on demonstration of various propagation methods using seeds, cuttings and bulbs of California natives. Bring lots of questions!

Bruce will also be leading a field trip to the RECON nursery grounds in Imperial Beach on November 18. Directions in the November newsletter. Call Bruce at (619)247-4520 days for more information


September 16, 2003--Gardening with Natives
Greg Rubin, California's Own Native Landscape Design
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 101 Casa del Prado

With updated photos and a new presentation, Greg Rubin will be discussing how to successfully plan, install, irrigate, and maintain a native landscape. He will explore the underlying ecology that supports native plant communities, and describe how to translate it to your home garden. Greg will explain why these practices differ so substantially from the ornamental horticulture we've been taught. Different, but not more difficult; in fact, setting up a native garden should be easier. Greg will explore the benefits of "going native," creating a beautiful landscape that also attracts birds and butterflies, while saving water and maintenance. All the misconceptions about being difficult, unstable, short-lived, and a novelty will fly out the window as Greg shows you just how mainstream a native landscape can be.

NOTE: This is a different room then our usual meeting. It is a larger room just across the hall. Coast Live Oaks (Quercus agrifolia) will be available for $5 each for a one gallon plant. Please bring cash, exact change preferred. Books, posters and seed will also be available for sale at the general meeting.


July 15, 2003 -- Herbicidal Control of Invasive Plants
Carl E. Bell, UC Cooperative Extension
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

What are the risks and benefits of using a herbicide to kill invasive plants? How toxic are these chemicals, what laws and agencies govern their use, and how do they effect things around them? For a discussion of these and other questions regarding herbicides, come to the CNPS meeting on July 15. Carl E. Bell, Regional Advisor - Invasive Plants for the University of California Cooperative Extension will present information on the process of pesticide registration and use.


June 17, 2003 -- Vulcan Mountain Reserve
Susan Cary, Executive Director Volcan Mountain Preserve Foundation
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Susan Cary, Executive Director Volcan Mountain Preserve Foundation, will talk to us about Volcan Mountain, an extraordinary treasure in San Diego County. Rising 5,000 feet and covering more than 25,000 acres, this majestic 15 mile ridge lies in the heart of San Diego CountyÕs backcountry, stretching from Lake Henshaw to the Anza-Desert with the historic town of Julian at its feet. Volcan Mountain is a vital link in a chain of protected land. It supports a unique ecosystem reflecting a great diversity of vegetation and wildlife, which has remained virtually undisturbed. Since 1988, the Volcan Mountain Preserve Foundation in cooperation with private organizations, public government agencies and principal landowners on the mountain has been able to preserve over 4,000 acres in public ownership.


May 20, 2003 -- Woodpeckers Wouldn't Have Homes Without Mushrooms, and Other Stories
Les Braund, San Diego Mycological Society
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

The San Diego Mycological Society is a fairly new group started in 1997 and Les Braund, its President, will be giving our chapter a talk on mushrooms. Les will start his talk with an introduction to the mushrooms of San Diego County. He will show us slides of the various species in the county and will cover information relating to poisonous and edible species. The bulk of Les' talk will cover mushrooms and some of their connections to wildlife system functioning. The San Diego Mycological Society website is at www.sdmyco.org.


April 15, 2003--What the Mountain Defense League Is and What It Does
Dick Gadler
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

The Mountain Defense League (MDL) is a citizen-based lobby dedicated to the protection of San Diego County's and the surrounding region's mountains, wildlands, and rural communities through wise land-use planning and resource preservation. Dick Gadler will review the history of the organization and its most notable accomplishments, as well as the means used to attain some important victories. There will also be a discussion of useful strategies that both CNPS and the MDL can use to preserve the remaining natural resources in San Diego County.

Dick came to San Diego in 1951 when it was still a "cow town" with a two lane road through Mission Valley and a countywide population of about 250,000. After earning degrees in Business Administration and Historic Sites Archaeology, he worked as an environmental specialist in the old Environmental Analysis Division, County of San Diego.


March 18, 2003--Seasons throughout the coastal garden year
Dave Buchanan, Ocean Sage Landscaping
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Did the long-delayed "El Nino" rains resurrect the "planting bug" in you? Are you looking for ideas on planning, starting or just adding to a California native garden? Considering new combinations of flowering or colorful native plants from your local nursery or native plant sale? Landscape contractor Dave Buchanan (Ocean Sage Landscaping), who has been designing, installing and maintaining residential native plant projects since 1985, has some inspiration for you.

Dave's fascination with native plants began as a child. Before the surveyors arrived, before the bulldozers scraped the vernal pools, barrel cactus, trap-door spiders and horned lizards into ten lanes of constant hum, Dave escaped to and explored amongst an extensive canyon system north of Mission Valley. Reawakening the feel, and more significantly, the scents of his idyllic youth by transforming manicured lawns into native plant habitats has become his passion.

Dave will share many observations ... and photos .... of seasonal cycles of bloom, color, texture and change throughout the Southern California coastal garden year. Many of the landscapes display plants, some not commonly utilized, that should be available at the CNPS Spring plant sale to be held on March 29, 2003 at Tree of Life Nursery, San Juan Capistrano.


January 21, 2003- Ambrosia pumila: Strength, Development & Reproduction
Josh Corona Bennett, San Diego State University
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Josh Corona Bennett will discuss the federally endangered herbaceous perennial, Ambrosia pumila. Topics will include: growth characteristics, sensitivities to transplantation, viability of pollen and seeds, and ideas for future studies on the plant.


November 19, 2002- Brush Management in Environmentally Correct Areas
Lisa Wood, City of San Diego, Environmental Services Department and Eddie Villavicencio, City of San Diego, Fire Department
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

The Viejas (Alpine) and Potrero wildfires of January and December 2001 and the Gavilan (Fallbrook) wildfire in February 2002 occurred outside of what in the past has been San Diego county's fire season (May to November). The potential for continuing drought conditions and the presence of lots of tinder-dry brush suggest that brush management needs to be a year-round activity.

Biologist Lisa Wood and Deputy Fire Marshall Eddie Villavicencio work in the Brush Management program for their respective departments. Lisa ensures that all necessary permits are obtained for brush removal and that the work is done in an environmentally sensitive manner and Eddie investigates all complaints of potential fire hazards involving vegetation on city or private property. They are both also involved in efforts to educate the public on fire safety. After a slide show and an informal talk on what the homeowner can do to ensure the safety of their property, Lisa and Eddie will open the meeting to questions from the attendees.


October 15, 2002 - Propagation of California Natives
Bruce Hanson, RECON Environmental, Inc.
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Biologist Bruce Hanson runs the propagation operation for RECON's habitat restoration group. Did you miss the Chapter plant sale or arrived too late to purchase that particular native? Bruce will give a hands on demonstration of various propagation methods using seeds, cuttings and bulbs of California natives. Bring lots of questions!

Before the program, CNPS will thank special guest Christine Kehoe (76th Assembly) for her work in promoting legislation to protect wetlands. Assemblymember Kehoe has acquired more than $1 million for the San Diego River and sponsored legislation to create the San Diego River Conservancy.


September 17, 2002 - Horticultural Program: Natives in the Home Garden Design
John Noble, Coastal Sage Gardening
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

From natural to formal landscape design, native plants are wonderful to work with. John Noble will explain how the natives easily fit into natural landscapes and can be incorporated into Japanese style gardens, Italian formal gardens, French sculpture gardens, English cottage gardens or any other created gardens. John (and his partner Jodi Shagg) owns the herb shop In Harmony Herbs & Spices, and the landscaping business, Coastal Sage Gardening.


July 16, 2002 - Conserving the Pines on Guadalupe and Cedros Islands: A Multinational Expedition
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Deborah L. Rogers, Ph.D., University of California, Davis

The native range of Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) is narrowly restricted, disjunct, and binational. In addition to the three coastal California locations (Ano Nuevo, Monterey peninsula, and Cambria area), there are Monterey pine populations on two Mexican islands off Baja California - Guadalupe and Cedros Islands. Challenges to the California populations - including habitat loss to residential and recreational developments, habitat fragmentation from transportation corridors, and significant tree mortality from an introduced fungal disease - prompted a chapter of CNPS to petition to have the species listed as threatened under the California Endangered Species Act.

However, the Monterey pine population of most concern is that on Guadalupe Island, where only approximately 200 mature trees (and no regeneration) remain. Goats introduced to the island over a century ago have provided constant grazing pressure and there has been no natural regeneration of the pines there for decades. The pines on Cedros Island are more plentiful and reproducing well, but there is little known about the apparently frequent fire cycles and genetic diversity of this population.

In May, 2001, a multinational expedition, organized by Dr. Deborah Rogers, was made to Guadalupe and Cedros Islands to determine the status of the pines, collect seeds for conservation and research purposes, and gather other information that could be used to inform restoration plans. Dr. Rogers' presentation will provide dramatic views and recent insights on the pines of these two Mexican islands; their conservation prospects and opportunities; and the international interests and concerns that led to a successful, constituency-building, and infinitely memorable expedition.

Deborah Rogers is a Conservation Geneticist with the University of California's Genetic Resources Conservation Program. She conducts research on genetic diversity and structure in temperate forest tree species and seeks appropriate and effective means by which to incorporate this information into conservation plans and forest management. Deborah is also a member of the CNPS East Bay Chapter.


June 18, 2002 - Scientific Realities and Questions About the Flora of San Diego County
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Jon P. Rebman, Ph.D., Curator of Botany San Diego Natural History Museum

San Diego County boasts the highest biodiversity of any county in the continental Unites States, but what do we actually know about the organisms? What areas of San Diego County have the greatest floristic diversity? How does the lack of voucher specimen documentation for our county affect the scientific knowledge of the plants that occur here? What new plant species are yet to be discovered in our region? What can we do to increase our botanical knowledge of our area of the world?


February 19, 2002 - Butterflies and Native Plants
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
David Faulkner, Entomologist

David Faulkner was head of the San Diego Natural History Museum's Entomology Department for 25 years and remains a research associate. He runs Forensic Entomology Services while still maintaining an interest in Lepidoptera. His topic will emphasize local butterfly species and how to attract and establish in the yard both butterflies and moths using native plant species.


January 15, 2002 - Propagation of California Natives
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Jeanine De Hart

CNPS San Diego has once again held a very successful plant sale. Several people donated plants, a way to obtain material not often available in the retail nursery. Now is the time to plan for the October 12, 2002 plant sale (as well as growing plants for your own gardens). Our speaker is a longtime CNPS member, botanist, former California Natives contract grower. She will discuss the propagation of Romneya coulteri (Matilija poppy), Salvia clevelandii (Cleveland sage), and other favorites. The discussion will include propagation methods and soil mixes. Come prepared to ask lots of questions!


December 18, 2001 - Potluck/Slideluck Fiesta
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

December is our Potluck/Slideluck Fiesta. Bring good cheer, a delicious dish of food, and up to 20 slides to share with other members. Beverages will be provided by the chapter. Please bring your own plate and utensils. A carousel slide projector will be provided. If possible, bring your slides already arranged in a carousel. See you all there!


September 18, 2001 - Creating the California Home Garden
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
(Note: The room number has been changed for this meeting only.)
Don Hohimer - Teacher, Alpine Union School District

So many residential gardens lack the character to make them Californian. We are drawn to live in this diverse state, in part, because we are attracted to its natural beauty. Yet, the vast majority of home gardens and landscapes are void of native California elements. Plants admired in the wild can be brought into the home garden to give our landscapes a true southern California identity. We will discuss natural and organic approaches to experience wild California every day starting at your own front door. Take the steps to create wildlife habitat, and review the importance of children in them. Since we all live in California, isn't it time to make our home gardens look like they belong here, too?

Don Hohimer is a former CNPS board member and the current education chair. As a teacher in the Alpine Union School District, he has trained teachers county-wide in school gardening. His students have won numerous awards for their school gardens and community service projects, including the 1998 Sea World/Busch Gardens Environmental Excellence Award and the 2001 National Garden Grant. Don is also a board member of the Back Country Land Trust who designed and installed the Alpine Native Plant Garden at 2120 Alpine Blvd. He consults with Alpine locals to help them achieve a "wild look" in their own gardens.


July 17, 2001 - The Great Sand Waste: Natural History of San Francisco's Sand Dunes
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Pete Holloran, President, CNPS, Yerba Buena Chapter

Two centuries ago, massive sand dunes covered vast stretches of San Francisco, extending all the way to the bay shore seven miles inland. As the city grew, the fourth largest coastal dune system in California was transformed beyond recognition into Golden Gate Park, the Sunset, Richmond and Fillmore districts. Dune lakes, mobile dunes, dune sc rub, and coast live oak woodlands provided habitat for a diverse and interesting flora and fauna, including endemic species. Though much has been lost, pockets remain at the Presidio, Fort Funston, and in neighborhood parks. In recent years, with the advent of natural areas stewardship programs run by the National Park Service and the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department, hundreds of volunteers have begun restoring the remnant dunes by removing invasive plants and planting natives. Pete Holloran reviews the natural history of San Francisco's dunes and current stewardship efforts. His talk will include dramatic historic photographs.


June 19, 2001 - FIRE: Part II - Fire Management in the National Forests
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Kirsten Winter, Cleveland National Forest

Fire is a natural process in southern California. But, with increasing urbanization, the effects of wildfire on watersheds and downstream homes and infrastructure is of increasing concern. Kirsten Winter will discuss how federal agencies manage areas during and after a wildfire, and the types of post-fire treatments that are implemented. Examples from several recent fires on the Cleveland National Forest will be featured.


May 15, 2001 - FIRE: Part I - The Natural History of Fire in Southern California
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Michael Wangler, Cuyamaca College

Enjoy an informal phototour from the Ramona/Julian area down to the Anza Borrego desert. The show will feature chaparral habitat at the higher elevations and creosote bush scrub plants of Anza Borrego. California lilac (Ceanothus spp.), probably white-bark ceanothus (Ceanothus leucodermis), ocotilla (Fouquiera splendens) and sand verbena (Abronia villosa) are expected to be blooming.


April 17, 2001 - Spring Flowers Slide Show
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Sue Fouquette, Kay Stewart, Skip Shaputnic, Jeanine De Hart and Gladys Baird

Enjoy an informal phototour from the Ramona/Julian area down to the Anza Borrego desert. The show will feature chaparral habitat at the higher elevations and creosote bush scrub plants of Anza Borrego. California lilac (Ceanothus spp.), probably white-bark ceanothus (Ceanothus leucodermis), ocotilla (Fouquiera splendens) and sand verbena (Abronia villosa) are expected to be blooming.


February 20, 2001 - Fungi of San Diego County
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Tom Zink, Program Manager, Soil Ecology and Restoration Group, San Diego State University

Tom's program will consist of three parts: a short discussion of the ecology and life cycles of soil fungi and how fungi fit into the overall soil ecosystem regarding functions and processes involved; a slide show to introduce the basic types of macrofungi (mushrooms) to be found in the San Diego area, including specific species of interest and importance for either food value or their toxicity; and lastly, a hands on demonstration on keying and identifying local species that can easily be found throughout the San Diego area. Emphasis will be placed on the pitfalls of correctly identifying mushrooms since southern California is home to numerous mushroom species that range from mildly toxic to deadly poisonous.


January 16, 2001 - California Wild Heritage Campaign
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Camille Armstrong, San Diego Sierra Club

Good news! You can help protect and create new Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers here in San Diego County. The San Diego Chapter of the Sierra Club has been working for two years on a campaign called the California Wild Heritage Campaign. This campaign is a state-wide campaign to get national legislation passed that will protect several million acres of our National Forests and lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management as wilderness and wild and scenic rivers.

San Diego County has 20 areas totaling over 100,000 acres in Cleveland National Forest and Bureau of Land Management that the Sierra Club has surveyed and are recommending be included in the legislation this spring for Wilderness designation. The Sierra Club has gone on many trips to discover that these areas are incredibly remote, pristine, and beautiful.

Camille Armstrong, chair of the Forest and Wilderness subcommittee of the San Diego Sierra Club, will present a slide show that gives an overview of these wonderful areas that are yet unprotected from illegal off-road vehicles and road building.


December 19, 2000 - Potluck/Slideluck Fiesta
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

December is our potluck/slideluck fiesta. Bring good cheer, a delicious dish of food, and up to 20 slides to share with other members. Beverages will be provided by the chapter. Please bring your own plate and utensils. A carousel slide projector will be provided. If possible, bring your slides already arranged in a carousel. See you all there!


November 21, 2000 - Propagating Your Own Plants
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Jeanine De Hart

For those people who missed the fabulous CNPS Plant Sale or got there too late to purchase their favorite native, Jeanine De Hart will present a program on propagating your own plants. She is author of Propagation Secrets for California Natives, botanist, and former California natives contract grower. Jeanine will teach us her secrets on growing Encelia californica, Sisyrinchium bellum, Ceanothus and other plants from seed. Other methods of propagation will also be covered including root cuttings (e.g., Romneya coulteri) and stem cuttings (e.g., Galvezia speciosa).


October 17, 2000 - Dudleyas: The Live-Forevers
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Liz Kellogg

Mark Dodero will present a program on the native live-forevers and their habitats. Mark has been cultivating and observing dudleyas since his early childhood days in San Diego. He has studied and observed dudleyas in southern California and Baja California and has wonderful slides to share. Mark¼s thesis, which he completed in 1995, is entitled "Phylogenetic Analysis of Dudleya subgenus Hasseanthus (Crassulaceae) using Morphological and Allozyme data", but don¼t let that scare you. Mark¼s talk will provide an overview of the distribution, evolutionary biology, population dynamics, pollination biology and natural history of the genus Dudleya, particularly the Hasseanthus group (which includes D. brevifolia, D. blochmaniae, D. variegata, D. multicaulis and others). He will also discuss techniques that can be used for propagation, enhancement and restoration of existing population so that they persist in our MSCP preserve lands.


September, 19 2000 - Private Restoration: An Unconventional Approach to Native Landscaping
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Greg Rubin

Greg Rubin will discuss strategies for developing successful native landscapes, using methods that often have little to do with conventional gardening wisdom. These simple techniques were developed over years of painful trial and error, and incorporate very basic ecological principles. This is a response to the bad rap that natives have been getting from most of the horticultural community. What is the disparity between the Ceanothus that lives 200+ years in the wild, but only 5-10 years in landscapes? Why can't that natural ecology be captured at home? The goal is to create stable, long-lived, truly drought tolerant landscapes with minimal inputs. We use very little irrigation, no fertilizer, no tilling, no soil amendment (except in extreme cases), and take advantage of natural weed suppression to minimize maintenance labor.

Greg will talk about the importance of plant community based design, stronger reliance on evergreens to create a cleaner foundation planting and less maintenance (getting away from the "tumbleweed" look of summer/fall), and using appropriate mulches. He will touch on the concept of weeds vs. natives as an ecological switch, and how this relates to fire-scapes and fire ecology. Greg's hope is that by revealing landscaping secrets, we can begin to establish standard operating procedure for working with natives. The old methods often don't work. If native-scapes are to be viewed as serious mainstream alternatives to exotic landscapes, and our goal is to re-establish a sense of regional identity while creating beautiful gardens that increase available wildlife habitat, then we need to start creating landscapes that are attractive, clean, relatively problem free, low-maintenance, and stable.


August 2000
Traditionally, we do not have a program this month.


July 18, 2000 - San Clemente Island Plant Community Recovery Program
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Liz Kellogg

Liz Kellogg will present a program on the Navy's long-term monitoring program for plant community recovery following feral animal removal on San Clemente Island. The island is changing dramatically, both in terms of the recovery of shrubs and the many endemics that reside there.


June 20, 2000 - Where the Multiple Species Conservation Program is Now and What's Ahead
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Leah Katz

Leah Katz, County of San Diego Department of Planning and Land Use, will present a program on the County's Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP). She will cover the MSCP's historical background, current efforts and future plans. Leah has been working at the County for one year after graduating from UCSD with a degree in Urban Studies and Planning.


May 16, 2000 - Mediterranean-Type Shrublands of Alta and Baja California: General Characteristics and Response To Fire
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Dr. John O'Leary

Dr. John O'Leary, Professor of Geography at San Diego State University, will present a program on the characteristics and response to fire by Mediterranean-type shrublands, such as our chaparral and sage scrub vegetation types. Mediterranean-type climates occur in five widely disjunct regions of the world and support various forms of shrubland vegetation that are remarkably similar in their outward appearance or physiognomy. In most cases, the shrubs in these areas are members of different genera and families, and have independently evolved from other plants of different growth forms, i.e. they are products of evolutionary convergence.

Dr. O'Leary will briefly discuss the major shrubland types that occur in Mediterranean-type climate areas of the world. He will focus on chaparral and coastal sage scrub, two shrubland types that dominate undeveloped Mediterranean-type climate regions of Alta and Baja California. He will generally discuss major environmental controls on the geographic distribution of these shrublands as well as controls on the various types or associations of chaparral and coastal sage scrub recognized by some ecologists. Special attention will be paid to the role that fire plays in the reproductive dynamics of both shrubland types and to the herbaceous and suffrutescent vegetation that typically dominates the landscape during the first few postburn years.


April 18 - Natural Beauty in Every Direction
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado
Richard Herrmann

Professional wildlife / nature photographer Richard Herrmann will give a 40- minute slide presentation that captures the natural beauty of San Diego County. See images from our eastern-most deserts, to the top of our tallest peaks, down the foothills to the coastal plain, and finally through the waves and on out to, the open sea! Images will include animals, our unique vegetation types and more.

Richard Herrmann's images have appeared in National Geographic books, Outside, Time, Ranger Rick, Sierra Club calendars and many more. He will be bringing his latest poster to sell and autograph at the end of his program.


March 21 - Changing Perspectives in Tertiary Paleobotany of Western North America
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Diane M. Erwin and Howard E. Schorn
Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley, CA

The present flora and vegetation of California results from a complex interplay of physical and biological histories woven over the last 65 million years of Earth history (i.e., the Tertiary Period). Unraveling the often times baffling mosaic of western floral, climate, and landscape histories is difficult and laborious, but key to understanding the extant California flora. In fact, the field of Tertiary paleobotany in western North America is itself an exercise in history and one that helps explain why we are where we are today in the study of California paleobotany.

Paleobotanical and geological studies, largely within the last decade, have invoked major modifications to today's now "classic" interpretations of Tertiary vegetation in western North America championed over the last 70 years by two prominent California paleobotanists: Ralph W. Chaney (UC Berkeley) and Daniel I. Axelrod (UC Davis). Although these authors collectively influenced many of our ideas regarding floral change during the Tertiary Period in western North America, their studies of western paleofloras used a "picture matching" approach for identifying the fossil plants. Once identifications were made, the "nearest living relative" technique was then used to determine a particular fossil taxon's closest extant relative and this relationship used to infer fossil plant ecology and biogeography, as well as, various aspects of the paleoclimate and paleotopography. Needless to say, any errors in identification would modify interpretations of the paleophysical conditions under which the plants lived and dramatically alter their temporal and biogeographic histories.

We will present an overview of the history and current status of Tertiary paleobotany in western North America discussing the more rigorous and systematic approaches to taxonomy, that have revealed many of the previous errors of fossil plant identification. These studies using revised taxa and repeatable methods of climate analysis based on the preset-day and ancient plant-climate relationships reveals complex Tertiary climate changes that help explain the changing temporal and spatial histories of the western North American flora and vegetation. Climatic analysis of Tertiary lowland and upland fossil plant assemblages, in conjunction with a number of independent geological studies, have literally turned our previous perceptions of paleo-elevations and paleo-topography for the western U.S. upside down. These new lines of evidence suggest the Sierra Nevada and Nevada have been uplands for the last 65-plus million years, rather than a region uplifted just within the last five million years.


February 15, 2000 - Famosa Slough and Ocean Beach Sand Dunes
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Active and future restoration efforts at the Famosa Slough with Jim Peugh
The Famosa Slough is a City of San Diego wetland open space that occurs within an urban setting. The talk will review the existing conditions at the slough including hydrology, the primary plants and habitats, and wildlife species. The talk will focus on active and future planned salt marsh and upland restoration efforts. Some of the restoration efforts that will be discussed include exotics removal, planting with native upland species, removal of human disturbance in the salt marsh, creation of additional salt marsh, and creation of ponds to treat freshwater urban runoff.
AND
Sand Dune Habitat at Ocean Beach with Tim Fleming
Where the San Diego River meets the Pacific. A pictoral description of plants surviving by the sea. Specially adapted to shifting sand and sea salt, these plants are now faced with ever diminishing habitat as beaches are groomed and filled with people. Plants like the Beach Evening Primrose and Beach Sand Verbena build mounds about themselves--stabilizing the ebb and flow of sand at land's edge. Tim Fleming will show the transition from sand dune to salt marsh as the Sea washes up-river and wraps around the back edge of the fore dunes. In closing, he will show a small but successful pilot restoration project near Ocean Beach.


January 18, 2000 - Ferns of San Diego County
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

San Diego Fern Society Secretary and Newsletter Editor, Robin Halley, is an avid collector of ferns. In the past few years, he has been interested in ferns that grow in full sunlight and under xeric conditions including San Diego native ferns Pellaea mucronata and Cheilanthes newberryi. Robin will review San Diego's native ferns, their habitats and cultivation with slides and a discussion. Robin will also lead a field trip on January 29 to Mission Trails Regional Park to explore the ferns and other wet-season flora.


November 16, 1999 - Saving Sierra Forests
Tuesday, 7:30 PM, Room 104 Casa del Prado

Saving Sierra Forests -- We'll view "Saving Sierra Forests," a new slide show by the Sierra Nevada Forest Protection Campaign, which examines the problems facing the Sierra Nevada forest ecosystem and recommends new management practices that protect the ancient forests, forested watersheds, and biologically sensitive areas of the Sierra Nevada. This slide show is especially timely in light of the Forest Service regional Sierra Nevada management plan revision process currently underway. This process will affect logging and forest protection in the Sierra Nevada for years to come. The Sierra Nevada Forest Protection Campaign is a coalition of about 50 local, regional and national groups working to permanently protect the remaining ancient forests, wildlands, wild rivers, and other biologically important areas of the Sierra Nevada. They organize conservationists to get involved in the Forest Service's regional planning process for the national forests of the Sierra Nevada.


October 19, 1999 - Restoration of Joshua Tree National Park

Jane Rodgers will give us an introduction to arid lands stewardship from the perspective of a large national park. Joshua Tree National Park has been a pioneer in the field of desert plant propagation, and is home to the Center for Arid Lands Restoration. With slides she will review how our desert landscapes have changed over the last century, and what is being done to recover these altered landscapes.

Ms. Rodgers will discuss the Joshua Tree National Park Native Plants Nursery, active habitat restoration sites, natural landscapes, and sites that require some serious thought! Topics will also include such issues as salt cedar invasion, changing fire regimes, mine reclamation, and road rehabilitation.

Ms. Rodgers started working at Joshua Tree National Park in 1994 as the nursery manager for our native plants nursery. Prior to that she was in the Peace Corps in West Africa working on the edge of the Sahara in a much similar environment. Since 1996 she has been the vegetation specialist for the park, responsible for restoration, rare plant monitoring, fire as it pertains to vegetation, exotic plant management, landscaping, and other duties "as assigned"!

Join us for an informative evening!


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California Native Plant Society, San Diego Chapter
c/o San Diego Natural History Museum - P.O. Box 121390, San Diego, CA 92112-1390 -